High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9:00 AM to noon CT on HPPR

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

Punko de Mayo is TOMORROW, folks! Punk and Disorderly, High Plains Public Radio's latest regional music program, comes to you for one-hour every Saturday night (well, Sunday morning) and is dedicated to all things punk rock.

Plus, Bryan joins Steve Johnson on Open Range on Saturday at 2p CT. 

What vegetable is versatile enough to bring a zesty, big crunch to burgers at a backyard barbecue, but delicate enough to add a refreshing refinement to finger sandwiches at a garden party?

That’s right! Today’s Growing on the High Plains is all about the cucumber. Whether relishing them on hot dogs, thick-sliced on a salad, or elevating a normal glass of water to something spa-worthy, cool hands have been on cukes for more than 3,000 years.

Book lovers, mark your calendars! On Sunday, May 6, from 6 to 8 p.m. CST, HPPR Radio Readers invites you to a live, on-air, book discussion for the 2018 Spring Read: "WWI-Perspectives."

Don’t miss a spirited discussion of our four books with panelists from Panhandle-Plains Historical MuseumBethel College, & High Plains Public Radio + educators from across our region! The panelists will explore themes raised in the discussion of the book through contributed Radio Reader BookBytes. Plus, it will stream live on HPPR's Facebook page!

There’s a particular square-stemmed annual with fragrant leaves and tubular purple blooms that often polarizes High Plains gardeners. Some say it’s a nuisance. Some consider it a colorful harbinger of spring after a long, drab winter.

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, we’re talking about the divisive henbit, a member of the mint family that establishes itself in the fall, matures to thick foliage, and then blossoms in the spring but generally disappears with the first hot spell of summer.

High Plains Morning wants to thank Sarah McQuaid for the phone interview about her video for "Slow Decay," which was inspired by the true story of Bill Conner—a father who biked 1,400 miles across the US to raise awareness about organ donation. 

High Plains Morning thanks Lisa Hancock from the  Area Agency on Aging of the Panhandle  for stopping into the studio today to share information about their 2018 Older Americans Month Celebration: Engage at Every Age.

Here are the details!

WHEN:            

May 4, 2018

9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m

***Registration check in opens at 8:30 a.m.***

 --FREE EVENT!

“Like Lucinda Williams in a Carhartt jacket, Christy Hays works rugged metaphors into emotionally charged country folk.” —Austin Chronicle

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Don't miss our latest Texas-based singer-songwriter featured as part of the HPPR Living Room Concert Series: Christy Hays!She's a gifted singer-songwriter from Illinois, based in Austin, TX, but regularly pulled into Montana and the Pacific Northwest. Her voice and songwriting will be a real treat for HPPR listeners.

 

Christy Hays - LIVE IN CONCERT

Yes, we have no apricots (again)! In theory, apricot trees should thrive in our High Plains climate. They are hardy enough to survive the cold winters, and our dry summers actually aid in the maturation of their soft, sweet summer bounty. So why do our region’s apricot trees only yield fruit every 5 to 10 years?

EXCITING NEWS! This Tuesday night in Amarillo, HPPR's listening area has Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit, with folk icon Richard Thompson, LIVE IN CONCERT! And right now on High Plains Morning, you can get TWO FREE TICKETS!

Get in on Skip Mancini's Spring Garden Basket. Pledge your support TODAY from 9a-12p CT, during High Plains Morning, for your chance to win. PLUS, your dollars will be doubled thanks to Mary Emeny of Amarillo, TX! 

SUPPORT PUBLIC RADIO TODAY! Call 1.800.678.7444 or pledge online.

We all know that nothing compares to sun-ripened strawberries, home-grown in your own backyard. Well, spring has sprung, so it’s ripe time to begin planning your future crop.

Lynn Phipps has finally made it back to her hometown of Canyon, Texas—and she brought her partner, Joe DeLeon. Thankfully, they've also brought along their guitars, banjo, harmonicas, and vocal harmonies (though they seem to have forgotten their guitar picks). 

Thank you, the world. I can die now.

We’ve finally reached that hopeful time of year. It’s the time when winter loosens its icy hold on the High Plains and the first signs of spring burgeon up from the frozen ground, dotting the naked foliage with the budding promise of warmer times to come.

One of the dinner table’s most divisive vegetables gets some High Plains love. On today’s Growing on the High Plains, everything’s coming up broccoli. This notoriously-fussy grower has been the bane of many a gardener, but there are a few tricks about managing planting time and growing conditions to cultivate a successful crop, from stem to floret.

The West Texas A&M University Distinguished Lecture Series will present Dr. Travis Langley in a presentation titled “Psychology of Superheroes” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29 in the Hazlewood Lecture Hall at Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum (PPHM). Langley’s talk will explore heroism and psychology in connection with PPHM’s recently opened PDr. Travis Langleyop Culture exhibit.

Last week I shared my experience hunting down the elusive McFarland Juniper, so I thought this week I could offer a few more evergreen endorsements to round out your coniferous collection.

Today’s Growing on the High Plains will continue the conversation about landscaping with drought-tolerant evergreens. Gardeners, hedge your bets with a lovely Woodward Juniper perimeter, or perhaps rock out with a stunning, jade-hued Arizona Cyprus accent tree. Both trees are known to reach impressive heights, and neither require quite as much watering as you might expect.

COLLECTORS! MUSIC LOVERS! VINYL HOARDERS! AGING HIPSTERS! LISTEN UP! Across the US, vinyl enthusiasts celebrate RECORD STORE DAY on April 21st. This year, join High Plains Public Radio for our first-ever POP-UP VINYL SWAP at HPPR Studios—Amarillo (104 SW 6th Ave, Basement).

Today, the worlds of community radio and public radio collided in Texas.

High Plains Public Radio is thrilled to announce TWO NEW MUSIC SHOWS highlighting the best in folk, roots, acoustic, Americana and more—and they're BOTH hosted by regional DJs, born and raised on the High Plains! Don't forget to tune in THIS SATURDAY and catch HPPR's exclusive new programs, Songbirds and What the Folk?

I’ve long admired McFarland juniper trees—capable of growing to towering heights like an Italian Cyprus, but sturdy enough to withstand the severe High Plains droughts and wind. It had been a long-time dream to add one of these majestic trees to my landscaping, but would I actually be able to locate one?

The gift of live plants can be a welcome addition to any garden, but briars beware: it’s important to perform the proper due diligence of your recently acquired flora before you begin laying roots.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, I share a cautionary tale about my own personal experience integrating misidentified gifted plants into my garden, and the resulting siege that they aggressively waged against my existing vegetation. So gardeners take heed and head off any invasive maneuvers by properly identifying acquisitions before you plant!  

Perhaps Billie Holiday said it best: "Oh, what a little moonlight can do!" While she was surely evoking the charms of low-lit romance, the same rings true for an evening landscape.

Today's Growing on the High Plains shines a silver spotlight on moon gardens. You'll learn how to plant the perfect bed of luminous blooms and fragrant foliage to best enjoy your garden around the clock and throughout the entire growing season.

We might be weathering some chilly temperatures now, but High Plains gardeners know that it's not too soon to think about spring planting. Today's Growing on the High Plains gives a shout-out to one of my favorite "firsts" among springtime flower beds: the pansy.

These bright blooms look anything but shy, and they're available in a variety of shades and fragrances. I'll offer some hot tips for these cool-weather friends, as well their love-laced legend. 

They say there are three things that matter when making decisions about real estate: ECHOLOCATION, ECHOLOCATION, ECHOLOCATION. And I suppose this especially rings true even when you're setting up a new residence for hometown bats.

High Plains Morning thanks our esteemed guests on Tuesday, who stopped by the studio to announce the $91,000 grant from the Allstate Foundation's Purple Purse Challenge to further nonprofit work for domestic violence survivors in the Texas Panhandle.

We welcomed KathyTortoreo, Director of Crisis Services at Family Support Services and Connie Garcia, Executive Director at Martha’s Home. Both of these women dedicate their time to combat the impact of domestic violence and homelessness on women in their local communities.  FSS and Martha's Home are one of thousands of organizations this year to receive Allstate’s support, which supports the organizations’ missions to empower women and children to create a violence-free world. ***(Our honorary guest was Rex Young, 20-year Allstate Agent in Amarillo, Borger & Pampa, who was not present due to illness. FEEL BETTER, REX!)

Let's keep the folk music going in 2018!

Our next show features two gifted singer-songwriters, together and live in concert. Caroline Cotter is a globetrotting polymath yogi from Rhode Island. Michael Howard is a grown-up punk rocker from Anchorage, Alaska. In other words, there's no way this show isn't going to be a BLAST.

A big, leafy-green high five to two of Amarillo's favorite urban farm-to-table advocates: Brady Clark, Executive Director of Square Mile Community Development, and Danny Melius, Founder & Market Gardener of Nuke City Veg. 

They say, “Every rose has its thorn,” but not the beautiful blooms cropping up on today’s Growing on the High Plains. Nor do they require watering, pruning, or pest control—and yet they give new meaning to the word “perennial!”

GARDEN CITY! 

Don't miss Colorado-based folksinger RUPERT WATES, live in concert for the first time at our HPPR Living Room Concert Series! 

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