HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

pontnshoot / Flicker Creative Commons

Did you know that Oklahoma is the only state to have an official state meal?

As Cowboys and Indians tells us, the meal—which is actually more of a gut-busting cornucopia of awesomeness—was approved by the Oklahoma legislature in 1988. The meal is a showcase for cuisine from all over the Sooner State, but scarfing down the whole smorgasbord is going to require a bit of driving.

Jacomo Bairos conducts a magnificent performance of the Third Symphony, "Eroica" by Ludwig Von Beethoven. The program opens with Mozart's beloved Overture from "The Marriage of Figaro."

Last Words

17 hours ago
Hudson River School / Wikipedia

Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas, here to talk about death and dying, for our Fall 2018 book series. 

In reading and talking about the books in our series, I’ve found myself thinking about that moment when we cease to be one kind of thing and become another kind of thing.

A legend in the Texas Panhandle art world died last week.

Lightnin’ McDuff is perhaps most famous for his sculpture “Ozymandius,” two massive stone legs on a pedestal that can be found in a cow pasture between Amarillo and Canyon. The statue, which is based on Percy Shelley’s poem of the same name, has been featured in Slate and Atlas Obscura.

Music in His Prose

Sep 17, 2018
Richard Wagamese / Embers: One Ojibway's Meditations

In the novel Medicine Walk, Richard Wagamese writes a love song to the natural world. Wagamese published one book of poetry and a  lot of journalism.

It is poetry, and its music, though, that colors the narration in this book. Wagamese describes his teenage hero Franklin Starlight this way: “Out here where he spent the bulk of his free time there was no need for elevated ideas or theories or talk, and if he was taciturn he was content in it, hearing symphonies in wind across a ridge and arias in the screech of hawks and eagles, the huff of grizzlies and the pierce of a wolf call against the unblinking eye of the moon.”

¡Globalquerque! 2018 will take place at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (1701 4th St SW, at Avenida César Chávez). Enjoy musical performances in the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theatre and dance outside on the Plaza Mayor.

I Learned To Hunt As A Boy

Sep 14, 2018
Marcia Epstein

In the novel Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese, hunting is a major theme. Perhaps some readers are surprised by how young Franklin Starlight is when he learns to clean a rifle, age five, and by age seven, he is learning to shoot. He shoots targets and learns how to track. At the age of nine, he gets his first deer.

The final broadcast for the Summer 2018 season of Amarillo Symphony Presents is Thursday, September 13th at 7pm CT. Highlights include "South Pacific: Symphonic Scenario for Orchestra," an arrangement from Rogers and Hammerstein's seminal show by Richard Russell Bennett, and "Scatter," a concerto for Project Trio and orchestra written in 2016 by Adam Schoenberg.

High Plains Public Radio returned to South by Southwest (SXSW) 2018 for three days of nonstop live music, panels, networking, and FUN. We enjoyed meeting and hearing so many new artists, and everything learned went right back into our regional music programming on shows like High Plains Morning, Songbirds, Open Range, What the Folk?, Punk & Disorderly, Friday Night Blues, and Western Swing & Other ThingsClick here to see some videos of the performers we enjoyed.

Boot Hill Museum

The Kansas Cowboy Hall Of Fame is seeking nominations for folks who epitomize its cowboy ideals of honesty and self-sufficiency.

The hall of fame opened in 2002 at the Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City to recognize people who live the cowboy lifestyle and help preserve cowboy culture.

Stories That Must Be Told

Sep 12, 2018

Maya Angelou once wrote that there is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you. Stories can be a source of entertainment as well as enlightenment. They have the power to hurt and to heal. 

Our stories, our families’ stories, our people’s stories. These are the stones that form the foundation of our lives.  Sometimes, though, a story is a window into the heart of the teller.  A magic thread that pulls the soul of the speaker into the compassion of the listener.

Billy Hathorne / Wikimedia Commons

The town of Canadian, in the northern Texas Panhandle, has received a prestigious designation from the State of Texas.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, the Texas Commission on the Arts has named Canadian an official cultural district—one of only 26 such districts in the whole state.

An advisory committee is expected to recommend today that the Texas State Board of Education remove the word "heroic" from social studies curriculum when referring to defenders of the Alamo.

Outsiders

Sep 10, 2018
Posted November 24, 2016

Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese presents many lessons, and one of them is how it feels to be an outsider. All of us have this experience sometime, and for some of Wagamese’s characters, it was their permanent state.

The father-figure Bunky lives isolated in the rough backcountry of British Columbia. He is a classic loner as he raises the hero Franklin.

High Plains, we are THRILLED to welcome brilliant folk singer-songwriter Sarah McQuaid to HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as she's touring across the globe with her fifth album, If We Dig Any Deeper It Could Get Dangerous.

Sarah McQuaid - Live in Amarillo!

Friday, September 28th 
Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley)
Doors @ 7p ~ Show @ 7:30p
Suggested Donation: $15 
***Make life easy & please bring cash!***

Redemption Never Expected

Sep 7, 2018
Leslie VonHolten

This is bold, but I’m gonna say it: Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese should be in the literary pantheon of great father and son epics.

Eldon and Frank Starlight—damaged father, strange son—travel deep into the wilderness, confronting bears and existential demons, and they even meet an oracle, the mountain woman Becka, who tells them what lies ahead. Sure, there are no loud, heroic moments. Instead, we see the grace and honor of Frank as the hero in this elegiac, quiet book.  

We Are Our Stories

Sep 5, 2018
Phillip Periman / Used with permission

“Medicine Walk,” a novel by the indigenous Canadian writer Richard Wagamese, tells the story of Frank Starlight, a 16-year-old Indian boy without a mother and who has an absent, alcoholic, Native American father, Eldon Starlight. 

Frank was raised from birth by a farmer, an older man who lives in isolation near the wilderness in British Columbia. Even though he is not an Indian, the farmer raises the boy in the Indian way, teaching him to hunt and fish, to live off the land, and to practice the Indian way, what we might call mindfulness.

Wikimedia Commons

If you grew up in Texas, it’s likely that you were treated to tales of the noble and daring fighting force known as the Texas Rangers. The myth of the Rangers as heroes has carried down through the 20th Century, from the 1950s Lone Ranger TV series to the exploits of Walker, Texas Ranger. But now, a new book seeks to paint the Rangers in a new light.

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents TWO INCREDIBLE ARTISTS in the month of September in Garden City, KS. So mark your calendars, tell your friends, and reserve your seat TODAY! 

Both shows will be at:

HPPR Studios—Garden City

210 N. 7th Street, Garden City, KS
Show @ 7:00 pm
Suggested Donation: $15 
***Make life easy & please bring cash!***

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First up!

Sweet Remains Of Last Days

Sep 3, 2018
The Metropolitan Museum

The novel Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese is about a boy, Franklin Starlight, whose ne’er do well father shows up in his life not to help him as a mentor, but to demand help with his death process.

Eldon Starlight has not earned the right to request anything of this abandoned teenager, yet he does. End of life issues also may bring many of us face to face with relatives who make unearned demands. The grueling passage of death may cause difficult moments in even the best relationships.

A symphony with an identity crisis? Mahler's Symphony No. 1 was described in the composer's letters originally as a traditional symphony, but programs for its earliest performances described it as a symphonic poem. Thus began a series of revisions that eventually produced the definitive four movement work we'll be hearing as Jacomo Bairos conducts the Amarillo Symphony in a performance recorded April 2018 at the Globe News Center For the Performing Arts. Amarillo Symphony Presents airs Sunday at noon CT and again on Thursday 7pm CT. Hosted and produced by Stephen Johnson.

Today on High Plains Morning, we had a VERY full house. Tomorrow (September 1st) in Amarillo, the Yellow City Sounds Music Festival will rock Memorial Park on the main campus of Amarillo College from 2:00 to 10:00 p.m., so we welcomed some of the primary players into the HPPR Studio to tell us all about it.

Death as Birth - Nothing to Fear

Aug 31, 2018
Diane Goble

My name is Diane Goble from Sisters, OR:

I read Dr Gawande’s book, Being Mortal, when it first came out in 2014. I really appreciated reading end-of-life stories from a medical point of view. I was a hospice volunteer off and on for over 25 years and had a very different perspective on how healthcare decisions are made within families when no doctors, nurses or social workers are around. The one thing he and I, and Tolstoy, agree upon is that fear of death and dying seems to be nearly universal.

A big thank you to BJ Barham from American Aquarium for stopping by HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a chat about the new album, their current tour, and all the changes that have led to both. 

The Hard Questions

Aug 29, 2018
Wikimedia Commons / New York Public Library

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.

I had been told by a friend to read the book, Being Mortal, by Atul Gawande. So, on a long drive 16 - hour drive with my husband, we popped the CD’s into the stereo and began listening. The book held our attention, and then we purchased the book.

We’re thrilled that folk duo Ben & Emily Roberts, also known as Carolina Story, stopped in the HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a quick hello and a few songs. Their new album, Lay Your Head Down, features 12 original songs they’ve been stewing on for a long, long time. We’re so grateful the universe continued showering them with cosmic signs to keep at it, because this record has it all. They’re playing TONIGHT at the Six Car Pub and Brewery, 6pm.

High Plains Morning wants to thank Jacob Johnson, classical guitarist and lutenist based in the Dallas area, for stopping by the HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a quick chat and performance.

Jonathan Baker

On Sunday night, a group of music lovers gathered in the backyard of a house on Teckla Street in Amarillo, to hear the songs of a Panhandle musician who has gained a national reputation in recent years.

Ryan Culwell’s new record, The Last American, dropped this week, and The Washington Post promptly declared that the album “captures an American moment’s essence.”

It's A Meaningful Discussion

Aug 27, 2018
Rembrandt (1632) / Wikimedia Commons

In the last part of his book Being Mortal, Atul Gawande addresses the events following his father’s being diagnosed with a rare caner, astrocytoma of the spinal cord. Questions of surgery now or later, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, assisted living or hospice created emotions that swirled through the family like a tornado.

Facing the Ultimate Fact of Life

Aug 24, 2018
Joe Lovell - Amarillo, Texas

“Aging.”  That used to be just a word, one not often considered, that I reflexively associated with gaining access to things and experiences previously unavailable to me. 

Now, as I begin my sixth decade, “aging” is a word that reveals itself to me daily – in the aches and stiffness that greet my every morning; in the faces of my siblings, colleagues, and, of course, that sagging, grizzled image in the mirror; in the daily physical challenges of my parents and my wife’s; in the constantly declining memory of my mother-in-law.

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