Congress has passed the 2018 farm bill and — pending the expected presidential signature — it will be legal to grow hemp across the United States for the first time in more than 80 years. Colorado already feels like it's in first place, especially on the Western Slope.

Hemp was legalized in the state alongside recreational marijuana in 2014, and now more acres are grown here than anywhere else in the nation.  

How Pop-Up Super PACs Influenced The Texas Senate Race

4 hours ago

From Texas Standard:

Weeks before Election Day in November, reports indicated that the Texas Senate race would be the most expensive one in U.S. history. The last campaign-finance report showed that Ted Cruz and Beto O'Rourke collectively raised more than $100 million.

Public Domain

Xcel Energy recently announced an ambitious plan to go completely carbon free.

As Xcel spokesman Wes Reeves tells HPPR, the energy giant has set a goal across its eight-state service area to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent over the next 12 years.

At South High in Denver, cheerleaders in purple and white trot down the aisle of the auditorium as the Rebels marching band rolls in. Up goes a cheer from the students. It seems like a pep rally for the school’s sports team. But it’s not.

“Um, today we’re going to talk about the issue of vaping and Juuling in high school,” senior Colleen Campbell tells the crowd.

To fir or not to fir, that is the question! While we're all pining for the impending holidays, I thought I'd share some festive wisdom about an iconic, annual friend to many High Plains households: the Christmas tree. Even if you're from an artificial-tree household, it's fascining to know more about the different varieites of conifers that grace our holiday homes.

From Texas Standard:

Frank Vickers of Bastrop was on the couch watching “Jeopardy!” when there was a knock on the door. Before he could get up, a Bastrop County Sheriff's deputy was standing in his living room, ready to evict him.

A multi-faceted storm system is expected to race across North Texas starting Thursday afternoon, bringing cold rain, snow and wind — really strong wind.

Read her lips

A month away from becoming the next governor of Kansas, Democrat Laura Kelly says she’s deep into budget preparation.

Although she’s been as steeped in the workings of state government as any Kansas wonk during her 14 years in the state Senate, the Topekan says agencies find themselves in worse repair than she imagined.

“The problems are broad,” she said, “and they’re deep.”

Like many a cockamamie idea, this one was so crazy, it just might work.

But then again, the Bassler microbiology lab at Princeton University was built on crazy ideas that proved right, like that bacteria talk to one another, says Bonnie Bassler, director of the lab, chair of the Department of Molecular Biology at Princeton and investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Kansas Gov.-elect Laura Kelly insists the state budget she’s preparing can fully fund the state’s schools, expand Medicaid coverage to another 150,000 people and begin to repair a troubled child welfare system — without a tax hike.

The Democrat said Wednesday night she’ll lean on experience and relationships built over 14 years in the Kansas Senate to carve out compromises with lawmakers on those priorities.

Yet she described her job as daunting and state government as broken in several key areas.

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NPR Headlines

Congress has passed the 2018 farm bill and — pending the expected presidential signature — it will be legal to grow hemp across the United States for the first time in more than 80 years. Colorado already feels like it's in first place, especially on the Western Slope.

Hemp was legalized in the state alongside recreational marijuana in 2014, and now more acres are grown here than anywhere else in the nation.  

For nearly two weeks in September, developers who created apps for Facebook were able to access user photos that they should never have been allowed to see, the social media company announced Friday.

Up to 6.8 million users may have been affected, Facebook says.

The "bug" affects users who gave permission to a third-party app to access their Facebook photos. Normally, that would only include photos that someone actually posted to their timeline.

Episode #1851

45 minutes ago

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

A years-old Disney trademark on the use of the phrase "Hakuna Matata" on T-shirts has stirred up a new debate among Swahili speakers about cultural appropriation.

UPDATED! 2018 Living Room Concerts!