He’ll cringe when he reads this but, Republican U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran is part of “the resistance.”

Not always in obvious ways. Moreover, not in ways that come close to comforting those who view President Donald Trump as a clear and present danger to the nation.

But in his own quiet, Kansas way Moran resists the chaos of Trump’s Washington by advocating for a return to “regular order” in the U.S. Senate and the nation.

Different in style but still much like his late colleague, Sen. John McCain of Arizona.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids of Kansas' 3rd District had been in office for less than 24 hours when Republicans came out swinging with an attack ad.

"With her very first vote in Congress, Sharice Davids caved to the party bosses and voted to support Nancy Pelosi for Speaker," says a female narrator, with chilling music in the background.

From Texas Standard:

Once survivors of domestic abuse are in a safe place, and looking to start building their future, they can face another roadblock: debt. Abusers can use debt to hurt or trap a potential victim. And for many, credit cards and loans taken out under two names, but never paid back, can cripple a survivor financially. It's called "coerced debt." The person who coined the term is Angela Littwin, a law professor at the University of Texas specializing in bankruptcy and consumer protection.

Colorado is far from Washington, D.C., but impacts of the partial government shutdown are hitting the state's workforce.

More than 2,000 federal workers in Colorado have applied for unemployment since the shutdown began last month. Most are in Jefferson County, but a large concentration also work in Boulder, Larimer and Weld Counties.

KUNC has been asking for your stories. This week we heard from three individuals in northern Colorado. These are their experiences, in their own words.

While working as an orthopedic surgeon in Hawaii, Dr. Diane Payne had treated one person with a gunshot wound in three years. But when she moved to Atlanta in 2013, Payne said it was like treating gunshot victims was suddenly all she was doing.

“I was shocked by the number of gun-related injuries that we’re seeing and taking care of here,” said Payne, who works at Atlanta’s busy downtown trauma center, Grady Memorial Hospital.

In 2013, Grady treated more than 600 gunshot victims.

Teachers fleeing the state? Promises to schools broken time and again?

Here’s some context for the statements you heard about Kansas education Wednesday night — both in Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly’s State of the State Speech and Republican Senate President Susan Wagle’s response.

Cheers from environmental groups drowned out nearby construction noise in downtown Denver Thursday morning after Gov. Jared Polis announced an executive order that aims to bring more electric vehicles to Colorado.

Angie Haflich / High Plains Public Radio

TUNED IN: Notes from Bob Davis, executive director of High Plains Public Radio

The new face at the studios of High Plains Public Radio is Corinne Boyer. She joined us earlier this month as the reporter covering western Kansas for the Kansas News Service, “a collaboration of public media newsrooms delivering critical reporting of sound and substance.”  

Corinne agreed to tell us a little more about herself, so here goes:

LINDA RODRIGUEZ

Listen each Friday, January 18 through February 8 as Linda Rodriguez of Kansas City discusses her point of view as author of the Skeet Bannion mysteries featuring a campus detective of Cherokee heritage. Radio Readers BookBytes are heard at 7:45 a.m. during Morning Edition and again at 6:44 p.m. during All Things Considered.

Creating My Cherokee Protagonist

9 hours ago
LINDA RODRIGUEZ

When I write fiction, I always begin with character. For me, all story and plot arise from character. For the Skeet Bannion series of mystery novels—Every Last Secret, Every Broken Trust, Every Hidden Fear—I knew I wanted to write about urban, mixed-blood Native Americans.

I am one myself, and so are many of my friends all around the country. In fact, there are more Natives living in cities now than on reservations.

Pages

Oleander—Thoughts from Here: New to HPPR!

HPPR's launches NEW MUSIC SHOW next weekend!

Need pop, electronic, hip-hop, & German Death Reggae?

Check out HPPR's latest show, straight out of Garden City, KS!

HPPR Living Room Concerts in February: Live in KS & TX

LIVE MUSIC IS BACK, High Plains!

Announcing our FIRST SHOWS of 2019!

HPPR Radio Readers 2019 Spring Read

Murder! Mayhem! MYSTERY!

HPPR Radio Readers Book Club presents the 2019 Spring Read!

NEW LINEUP FOR 2019! HPPR Living Room Concerts

New shows in Amarillo + Garden City!

Mark your calendars, MUSIC LOVERS!

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Last summer, All Things Considered and Atlas Obscura took a road trip up the West Coast. Along the way, they met Bob Carr, the creator of Bob's Crystal Cave near Joshua Tree, Calif., where he welcomed visitors for 15 years.

Bob died earlier this month at age 80. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth and daughter Zena. Bob "died as he lived — on his own terms and with dignity and grace," Elizabeth says.

According to a report by Billboard magazine on Friday afternoon, R. Kelly has been dropped by RCA Records. The move comes in the wake of a documentary series called Surviving R. Kelly that aired on Lifetime and cataloged more than 25 years of accusations of sexual and physical abuse made against Kelly by a number of women, including seven who were interviewed on camera.