Colorado Assault-Style Weapons Ban Doesn't Look Likely

9 hours ago

Any major push to pass an assault-style weapons ban in Colorado is looking increasingly less likely, with the legislature's highest-profile advocate for stricter gun laws saying now — weeks after the mass shooting that killed 10 people at a grocery store in the city of Boulder — isn't the time.

"It diverts all of the attention," says Democratic Rep. Tom Sullivan.

When an assailant stormed a grocery store in Boulder, Colo., last month and fatally shot 10 people, the suspected weapon of choice — a Ruger AR-556 pistol — captured immediate attention. Not for what it technically was — a pistol — but for what it more closely resembled — an assault-style rifle.

In April of 2009, a bespectacled former Army paratrooper and Yale Law School graduate took the microphone at a small rally just outside of Boston to introduce his new self-styled militia.

"I'm Stewart Rhodes," he said. "And I'm the founder of Oath Keepers."

That event on Lexington Green served as a coming-out party for Rhodes and Oath Keepers, a group that touts itself as a defender of the rights of Americans from what it views as a tyrannical government.

Former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says during his 30 years in Congress, and years earlier as a U.S. Capitol Police officer, a fencing system for the Capitol was not top of mind.

"That was never, ever considered when I was the leader, or when I served on the Capitol Police force — never considered," said Reid, who served in various congressional roles from 1983 to 2015 and as a Capitol Police officer in the 1960s while attending law school.

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Was Top Carnivorous Predator In Argentina

15 hours ago

A new dinosaur named for its ability to strike fear in its prey has been discovered by paleontologists in South America.

The skull of the dinosaur named Llukalkan aliocranianus, which means "one who causes fear" in Mapuche, a local indigenous language, was discovered in 2015 by a group of paleontologists in Argentina.

This story has been updated.

TOPEKA, Kansas — Republicans in the Kansas Senate weathered the initial arrest of their majority leader for drunken driving, but they booted him from leadership Friday after details of his arrest painted a picture of dangerous belligerence.

Senate Republicans met after finishing their work and voted in a closed-door meeting to remove Majority Leader Gene Suellentrop of Wichita from the job. Suellentrop did not attend the meeting or issue a statement. He will keep his seat in the Senate.

Bills aimed at restricting access to abortions in Texas are moving quickly through the state Legislature.

The Texas Senate already approved a slew of anti-abortion measures late last month. This week, the House heard a series of bills that would make it harder to get the procedure. The bills in the House committee were left pending, but could be approved at any time.

Here’s a rundown of immigration and other news from the Texas border and beyond. Look out for a weekly recap from reporters at Texas’ public radio stations.

Gov. Greg Abbott is calling for the Biden administration to shut down an emergency facility for migrant teens at the Freeman Coliseum in San Antonio due to safety complaints received by the state.

Updated April 9, 2021 at 9:20 PM ET

The House Ethics Committee announced Friday it has launched an investigation into alleged misconduct by U.S. Rep. Matt Gaetz following a recent flurry of accusations against the Florida congressman, including illegal drug use and sexual misconduct.

It's official: This week U.S. health authorities announced that the mutant strain of the coronavirus first identified in the United Kingdom last winter is now the predominant strain in the United States. And it's been found in at least 130 other countries as well.

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La Soufrière, the highest peak on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent, began to explosively erupt Friday morning, forcing thousands to evacuate as ash and smoke filled the sky.

And a larger eruption may be on the way.

More businesses are requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccines. NPR's Michel Martin discusses legal implications with Robert Field, professor of law and public health at Drexel University.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Atlantic staff writer Yasmeen Serhan about her recent piece.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Victoria Walker, senior travel reporter for The Points Guy, about airline companies' use of digital COVID-19 vaccine cards.

The Chinese government says it is issuing a $2.8 billion fine on the e-commerce company Alibaba Group for violating its anti-monopoly regulations.

Alibaba is one of the most influential tech giants in China and the world. The company was under investigation by the Chinese government since December for "suspected monopolistic conduct."

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