Updated at 9 p.m. ET:

A day after an insurrection that overtook the U.S. Capitol, the Capitol's three top security officials resigned from their posts amid building pressure from lawmakers and others over failures that allowed the dramatic breach.

The House and Senate's top protocol officers and the U.S. Capitol Police chief are now all expected to be replaced following a series of resignations in the wake of the security failures.

Updated on Jan. 7 at 1:55 p.m. ET

After the violent takeover of the U.S. Capitol, calls have continued to grow from Democrats and Republicans in Congress, as well as former U.S. officials, for Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to the Constitution and assume the powers of the presidency.

Facebook said Thursday it is banning President Trump until the end of his presidency and possibly longer. It is the most forceful action a social network has taken against Trump, who has spent months using social media to amplify disinformation and cast doubt on his loss in the presidential election.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote that removing or labeling Trump's posts is not enough in the current environment in which Trump has used Facebook to encourage mob violence on the U.S. Capitol.

Seventeen Texas Republicans were among the eight U.S. senators and 139 representatives who voted to sustain objections to the electoral vote counts of at least one state this week.

Those totals weren't nearly enough to change the Electoral College count, which showed President-Elect Joe Biden with a clear victory.

Updated at 5:00 p.m. ET

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer have called for President Trump to be removed from office via the 25th Amendment.

"I join the Senate Democratic leader in calling on the vice president to remove this president by immediately invoking the 25th Amendment," Pelosi said at a news conference Thursday. "If the vice president and Cabinet do not act, the Congress may be prepared to move forward with impeachment."

When a pro-Trump mob attacked the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, surprisingly few police stood in the way. Protests had been expected for days, but police appeared unprepared for an actual insurrection and not even prepared to keep all the doors locked. Video showed police calmly talking with attackers after they moved into the building.

Prominent Texas Republicans criticized the actions of a pro-Trump extremist mob at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington D.C.

Sen. Ted Cruz and Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton have been at the forefront of conspiracy theories and court cases around the results of the 2020 presidential election. On Tuesday, Paxton spoke at a Trump rally in D.C. that preceded the insurrection.

Members of Kansas and Missouri’s Congressional delegations tweeted that they were safe after pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol Wednesday afternoon.

Reps. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Missouri, and Sharice Davids, D-Kansas, said that they were sheltering in place.

Today's Growing on the High Plains takes us on a page-flipping trip through one of my favorite seed catalogs: R. H. Shumway's. Rather than spoil it, just take a listen. It's been around since the 19th century, and the produce sold within still manages to delight modern patrons with its lively images, racy naming, and a variety of options to rouse the hearts of even the most seasoned gardeners.

In a day filled with shocking images, one of the most startling was a mob of President Trump's supporters surging into the U.S. Capitol with relative ease.

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The PGA of America has canceled plans to hold a major golf tournament at a Trump Organization golf course in New Jersey next year, citing concern over the organization's "brand."

The PGA of America Board of Directors voted Sunday night to terminate the agreement to play the 2022 PGA Championship at Trump Bedminster in New Jersey, Jim Richerson, the PGA of America President, announced.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we wanted to acknowledge that it's been difficult for many of us to think about the events of this past week without a fair amount of anxiety or anger or confusion about what comes next. Perhaps you're looking for some words of wisdom or comfort that can be heard above all the shouting. For that, we asked some of the faith leaders who we've talked to in the past on this program to share some of their thoughts for the current moment. We'll start with Bishop Michael Curry presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we wanted to acknowledge that it's been difficult for many of us to think about the events of this past week without a fair amount of anxiety or anger or confusion about what comes next. Perhaps you're looking for some words of wisdom or comfort that can be heard above all the shouting. For that, we asked some of the faith leaders who we've talked to in the past on this program to share some of their thoughts for the current moment. We'll start with Bishop Michael Curry presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we wanted to acknowledge that it's been difficult for many of us to think about the events of this past week without a fair amount of anxiety or anger or confusion about what comes next. Perhaps you're looking for some words of wisdom or comfort that can be heard above all the shouting. For that, we asked some of the faith leaders who we've talked to in the past on this program to share some of their thoughts for the current moment. We'll start with Bishop Michael Curry presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church.

Golfer Justin Thomas apologized for muttering a homophobic slur under his breath after he missed a putt during the Sentry Tournament of Champions in Kapalua, Hawaii on Saturday. The golfer said he was unaware that he even had said the slur until after the round was played.

Shortly after the incident, Thomas spoke with the Golf Channel, offering up an apology.

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