News

As we spend this week honoring the thousands of HPPR members that support this station, I'm reminded that the end of the year is upon us—as is the chill of the holiday season. Today's Growing on the High Plains takes flight with one of the brightest spots on the pale, winter landscape to which we all come accustomed during the cooler months on the High Plains. Let's talk about our bright buddy, the cardinal. Of all the birds spotted on a snowy bough, he's the one you simply cannot miss.

Today, we spoke with Rachel Flores, the Executive Director of Amarillo Art Institute, about the latest iteration of their annual Holiday Market and Potters Show. Despite the many delays and adjustments to the schedule, these two events are UP AND RUNNING, with safety procedures in place to protect the shoppers, the vendors, and the volunteers.

Prick up your ears, because today's Growing on the High Plains takes a dig at the exquisite Christmas cactus. While it's not as popular as other holiday plants like the poinsettia, it's a seasonal delight that will brighten up your indoor space during the chilly winter months. Not your standard cactus, since it hails from the jungles of South America (so it's made of tough stuff!). So listen up for tips on how to best care for your Christmas cactus, including the ideal plan moisture, location, and transplanting.

After the year we’ve all had, there's nothing better than anticipating some down-home Christmas cheer and celebration. For those in Oklahoma, mark your calendars for the 28th Annual Chickasha Festival Of Light, which runs now through December 31st in Chickasha, OK. This year, the festivities will also feature music from regional folk duo The Imaginaries.

Saying it’s been a rough year for regional artists might qualify for understatement of the century, but High Plains Morning was grateful to see that we have some regional music on the horizon from a folk favorite, The Annie Oakley. Identical twin sisters, Jo and Sophia Babb, have owned their lockdown with nonstop music composition, creation, innovation (and more than a few colorful, coated candies).

Today’s Growing on the High Plains comes after catching up on some reading—something the relaxed days of the pandemic have finally allowed. I came across an article about an alarming invasive plant, giant hogweed. It’s taking over parts of Russia, and so far it’s seemingly impossible to contain. While that might seem far away, the dangerous weed is also in the US. Growing up to 16 feet, it emits a smelly, toxic sap which can harm the skin and eyes.

Nonprofits across our region have had to do some fancy footwork to keep their organizations afloat throughout an economic downturn and pandemic. However, they’ve risen to the occasion with innovative, virtual care and online events. Today, we checked in with David DeLoach, the Early Intervention Program Director at Russell Child Development Center in Garden City, Kansas.

There’s hardly an animal in our High Plains ecosphere more recognizable than the skunk. And once you see them, you worry that you might also SMELL them. However, today’s Growing on the High Plains will take a long look at these roving carnivores. With a little research, you’ll see that skunks surely earn their stripes in pest control. We’ll also talk about their infamous spray; it turns out you have to really get them angry before they would dare unleash their sulfuric mist.

There's nothing like falling leaves to make us stop and contemplate the coming changes of our lives. Bidding our withered, weathered summer plants "adieu" can feel somber, but the bright hues of autumn always pop up to offer consolation. Today's Growing on the High Plains waxes poetic on our sometimes fleeting seasons across this region. As we prepare for fiery fall colors on our often treeless landscapes, it's remarkable to reconize what our climate offers (and what that can bring). 

If you're feeling like you need some top-notch poetry in your life right now, mark your calendar for TONIGHT. As WT kicks off the Dorothy Patterson Poetry Series, they are featuring a treasure of the Texas Panhandle: writer, educator, and all-around rad dude, Seth Wieck. You can join the reading, which is ONLINE at 7 pm CT this evening via Zoom. To get the link, email Dr. Eric Meljac here and he'll send it straight away. A big thanks to Seth for his time, and see below for the text of the poem he read today on High Plains Morning. If you'd like to hear the full interview, click the link below.


It's been a LONG time coming, but it's finally here: the lecture presented by WTAMU's Center for the Study of the American West by Dr. José Limón.

Today's Growing on the High Plains might feel ready for Halloween as we discuss the ominous "assassin bug." Despite their moniker, rest assured that you'd actually WANT to see these predatory friends in your garden. But no matter where your garden is right now, given our recent winter weather, be grateful for the many insect friends you've hosted this season...and don't worry: they'll be back next year!

Meg Kelly/NPR

President Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are holding a final debate Thursday in Nashville, with Kristen Welker of NBC News moderating. After a haphazard first debate, and a canceled second one, this final debate has new rules established by the Commission on Presidential Debates. Follow live updates and analysis.

Loading...

https://www.needpix.com/photo/372439/common-garter-snake-snake-reptile-garter-animal-nature-wildlife-serpent-free-pictures

Snakes, toads, spiders and bats – the stuff of nightmares, especially for gnats.

On today’s Growing on the High Plains, these friendly foes are featured as the honestly helpful hombres for ridding your garden of the not-so-friendly creatures.

Listen for some ways to keep these garden guardians guarding your garden.

Thanks so much to Bradley Behrmann, the Director of the new WTAMU Theatre Department's performance of  The Theory of Relativity, a musical song cycle that's opening this Friday online. If you're brain is longing for some arts, culture, and live performance, this will be a welcome addition to your weekend plans. The show streams at 7:30 pm on Friday , Oct.

Now is a time of self-isolation to keep communities safe and healthy, so what better time to resurrect the reliable companionship of a pop-culture icon that embodies both a houseplant and a pet? That’s right: “ch-ch-ch-chia” plants are back in style. (Those who remember the iconic commercials surely have the jingle in their heads right now.

When life gets heavy, as it has been this year, turning to poetry can be a welcome catharsis, allowing us to view life through another's experience. For those of you yearning for some raw human connection, tonight will be a treat.

Get ready, because today’s Growing on the High Plains is on fire! In fact, we might even call it “Burning on the High Plains.” As you’ve surely noticed, autumn temperatures are descending across our region. It takes me back to memories of enjoying the brisk outdoors with my grandmother – a woman who thrilled at the prospect of lighting a warming bonfire. For what it’s worth, I seem to have inherited her “firebug” gene, though I’ve learned caution the hard way after a few close calls with careless burn piles. But now I have a tidy solution: my chimenea—an upright, clay patio fireplace that’s both front-loading and features a vertical smoke vent. This oblong oven allows for a well-positioned, safely-contained, and on-demand fire show. And as the evening glow grows dimmer, it keeps your outdoor relaxation station toasty and lit.

High Plains Morning doesn’t often delve into ethnobotany, but when we do, we make sure the sources are straight out of KANSAS! HPPR thanks teacher, researcher, and writer Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of Ecosphere Studies at The Land Institute in Salina, KS, for her time and insight regarding her work with perennial native plants and their potential as sustainable crops on the High Plains.

HPPR welcomed Beth Duke into the studio–masked up and distanced for safety–to share some exciting news about some upcoming events in downtown Amarillo, thanks to Center City. She joined me on High Plains Morning to remind music lovers of the Texas Panhandle that Jazztober starts TONIGHT and runs from 6:00-7:30 pm. The Martinis kick off the series, but it also features Austin Brazille, Esquire Jazz Band, and Ruth Ellen Lynch in coming weeks.

If you're ready for some homegrown teen drama, you've got a treat coming at you, Amarillo. A new performance will make its world premiere at Amarillo Little Theatre's Adventure Space this weekend, and it was written by a local playwright. The Ten (Thousand) Problems of a Teenage Girl, penned by Amarillo-based writer Carrie Huckabay, will take you through the high, the lows, the struggles, and the triumphs of becoming a modern young woman.

Today on High Plains Morning, we had a chat with David Waddle, the new host for HPPR’s latest regional music program, Western Swing Radio Rambler. The show premieres this weekend, hitting the airwaves on Saturday at 2:00 PM Central.

Today’s Growing on the High Plains will line up some facts about the energy and environmental benefits of planting a windbreak on your landscape. If you’re not sure what a “windbreak” is, perhaps you know it as a “shelterbelt”—those tightly-spaced rows of trees or shrubs that you might notice up and down the High Plains region. They provide shade in the summer and reduce the blasts from our High Plains wind on your abode throughout the year. But they also offer a lot of energy benefits.

We have great news, High Plains! StoryCorps, the national nonprofit organization dedicated to recording, preserving, and sharing the stories of people from all backgrounds and beliefs, will utilize a new virtual platform to record remote interviews across the High Plains Public Radio listener region from October 28th through November 25th as part of its Mobile Tour.

Now that we've tied off our deep dig on weeds, invasive plants, and other garden irritations, I'd like to take this week to discuss a smart, simple solution for keeping your veggies going strong well into the Fall. As the weather cools across the High Plains, I know many of us have a hard time saying goodbye to the summer bounty. But I recently read about an easy way to grow greens, root vegetables, and other autumn-friendly edibles in a bag. It's easy to move so it stays situated in the sun, and it's small enough to perch on a bench or table so it's easy on the back.

Despite the many challenges posed, our High Plains arts community has certainly NOT shut down during the pandemic. This weekend, West Texas A&M University's Departmetn of Theatre has a treat for vintage radio lovers across the region.

Today's Growing on the High Plains continues our series on garden headaches—hearty residents like weeds, invasive vines, and other pains-in-the-grasses. Now it's time to talk about the beguiling presence of pests that masquerade as benevelont with their pretty blooms. Don't  be fooled by wild poinsettia, "devil's claw," or chinese lantern plants! They may look fetching on the edge of your growing space, but trust me: they're up to NO good.

Tomorrow night, that’s  Thursday, Sept. 17, join the Center for the Study of the American West (CSAW) for its fourth annual Forgotten Frontera event: “Art, Activism, Community.” The event will begin at 7 p.m. (CT) and be held online via Zoom video conferencing.

Click here to register. Registrants will be emailed the Zoom link the day of the event. To hear our full interview, click the link below:

Pages