Stella M. Chávez

Stella Chávez is KERA’s education reporter/blogger. Her journalism roots run deep: She spent a decade and a half in newspapers – including seven years at The Dallas Morning News, where she covered education and won the Livingston Award for National Reporting, which is given annually to the best journalists across the country under age 35. The award-winning entry was  “Yolanda’s Crossing,” a seven-part DMN series she co-wrote that reconstructs the 5,000-mile journey of a young Mexican sexual-abuse victim from a small Oaxacan village to Dallas. For the last two years, she worked for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, where she was part of the agency’s outreach efforts on the Affordable Care Act and ran the regional office’s social media efforts.

A few weeks ago, 18-year-old Izcan Ordaz joined his high school classmates for his first protest. They called for racial justice as part of a national wave of Black Lives Matter activism. A few days later, he marched again in Keller, an affluent suburb of Fort Worth not usually known for protests.

The toll of the COVID-19 pandemic is staggering: More than 90,000 Americans have died of the disease and more than 38 million people have filed for unemployment since MarchWhile the pain is widespread, it hasn’t been equal.

The family of a man who died of COVID-19 has sued the West Dallas meat processing plant where he worked. The suit alleges Quality Sausage Company didn’t take the virus seriously or protect its workers. 

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the International Rescue Committee in Dallas had a plan — to encourage its clients to fill out the Census. Now the rescue committee and other groups are also making sure their clients — many of whom are refugees — have enough to eat and know how to stay safe.

They came from around Texas – dozens of college and high school age Latinos. Their message to political candidates: Listen to us, our vote matters.

The North Texas region leads the country in the number of people arrested by U.S. immigration and Customs Enforcement.

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A new study shows immigrants have a big impact on the North Texas economy. The group New American Economy says it wants to use this new data to show how immigrants are helping cities thrive.

There were more than four times as many women than men arrested Wednesday in the country's largest immigration raid in 10 years, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said. The 284 workers came from 15 different countries.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Wednesday arrested 284 employees at a technology repair company in a Dallas suburb on charges of working in the United States illegally. Officials say it's the largest worksite raid in the country in 10 years.

Vice President Mike Pence came to Dallas on Monday to campaign for a pair of Republican incumbents, U.S. Rep. Pete Sessions and U.S. Senator Ted Cruz. Both are facing tough Democratic challengers.

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