All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4 to 7 pm CT on HPPR and 3 to 6:30 pm CT on HPPR Connect; weekends from 4 to 5 pm CT and from 6 to 7 pm CT

All Things Considered: Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio news magazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand the world. HPPR adds a High Plains perspective with regional weather and community events.

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A year ago, when people were losing jobs left and right, millions called their local unemployment agency. Like many states, Texas struggled to deal with the volume of people applying for unemployment — which meant busy signals and long hold times. When you're dealing with the soul-crushing inefficiency of a government bureaucracy pushed beyond its purposely limited limits, sometimes you have to make the best of it.

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with sex therapist Dr. Bat Sheva Marcus about her upbringing, career, and advice from her new book Sex Points.

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Just two months ago, airlines were warning about furloughing thousands of pilots. Now they're putting up help-wanted signs. As NPR's David Schaper reports, that's because air travel seems to be recovering more quickly than expected.

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Far more Asian American students are learning remotely than members of any other racial or ethnic group in the U.S., according to the latest federal data. NPR's Anya Kamenetz reports that the reasons are complex, and the consequences may be damaging.

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For nearly four decades, Martha Lou Gadsden served her brand of Southern soul food from a converted gas station in Charleston, S.C. She died last Thursday at the age of 91.

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President Biden today announced he is moving up his deadline for when he wants all adults to be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccination.

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Switching between Swahili and English, Dr. Frank Minja asked the African immigrants on the Zoom call if they had any questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

Minja, who is originally from Tanzania, was asked how to get the vaccine, how it works, whether it's safe.

Then one person asked him about a video promoting the conspiracy theory that the vaccine is part of a plot to reduce the Black race.

"That's the realm of nonsense and misinformation," he said.

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Canopies of pink and white flowers are blanketing Washington, D.C., after the city's cherry trees hit full bloom last week.

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The pandemic has canceled a lot of events. In one Tennessee county, it took away a beloved one - a campy agricultural celebration called Mule Day. From member station WPLN, Paige Pfleger reports.

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Earlier today, the pastor led an Easter Day service.

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CURTIS FARRAR: Good morning, everybody.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Good morning, pastor.

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And finally today, even though this year's Mardi Gras didn't feature the usual crowded musical parade, a new album is bringing the culture and celebration of New Orleans directly to you.

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We're often told that in order to grow as a person, we have to learn - learn new ideas, new skills, new strategies. But our next guest thinks that in order to grow, it's important to also put aside a lot of what we've been taught.

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A recent study of mummified parrots found in a high-altitude desert region in South America suggests to researchers that, as far back as some 900 years ago, people went to arduous lengths to transport the prized birds across vast and complex trade routes.

The remains of more than two dozen scarlet macaws and Amazon parrots were found at five different sites in northern Chile's arid Atacama Desert — far from their home in the Amazon rainforest.

So how did they get there?

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