2019 Fall Read

Radio Readers BookByte: Some Set of Reads

Nov 4, 2019

Hello, Radio Readers! Can you believe it’s November already? And we’re almost at the end of our Fall 2019 Book Club series! Was this not some set of reads?

I’m Jane Holwerda, from Dodge City KS, and, at Radio Readers Book Club Headquarters, we’re gearing up for our live and on-air book discussion.  

Radio Readers BookByte: Cognitive Revolution

Nov 1, 2019
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When I started with Yuval Noah Harari’s Homo Deus, I expected to jog along with a fun and clever assessment of human history and its near future as a cyborg-like merger of human and computer.

But I had trouble early on.

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This is Leslie VonHolten of Chase County, Kansas, with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.

Well of course the joy of reading is found in books that transcend your expectations, that open your world or captivate you with a good story of whatever.

But every once in a while, I come across a book that I so actively hate, and instead of tossing it aside because life is short, I choose instead to let myself embrace it.

Radio Readers BookByte: Dataism - Good, Bad & Ugly

Oct 28, 2019
Artificial Intelligence Elon Musk, Hawking / Wikimedia Commons

Data Yoda says, “the greatest sin would be to block the data flow.” And with missionary zeal, we are told the “great web of life” requires that everyone and everything must be connected, want it or not.

Data Yoda tells us we will live only so long as data flows freely. No flow, we die. The greatest good, therefore, is freedom of information. This, Harari says, is Dataism.

Radio Readers BookByte: My Friend Al (Go Rhythm)

Oct 25, 2019
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In “Homo Deus,” Yuval Noah Harari’s last chapter posits humans as algorithms.

First, we need to clarify the word “algorithm,” whose meaning has morphed to mean almost any computer program. An algorithm is a description of a computer program in plain language and enough detail that working programs in real computer languages can be written using the algorithm as a guide. Here is a very simple example from a program fragment using an if/else decision:

Radio Readers BookByte: Knowledge is Exponential

Oct 22, 2019
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Hello, my name Eric Mercer. I am an industrial and organizational psychology practitioner in the southwest Kansas area. The book, Homo Deus, purports not to present predictions, but merely possibilities and potentials of future human endeavors; as well as, perhaps, some timely warnings and reminders of what makes us human. 

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In “Homo Deus” (Latin for “man, the god”), Professor Yuval Noah Harari tells us a new religion is coming out of California’s Silicon Valley. It is called “Dataism.”

Educated - Self Identity From Scratch

Oct 7, 2019
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This is Nicole English coming to you from Fort Hays State University for HPPR's Book-Bytes. This is a discussion of the book, Educated: A Memoir.

The book describes Tara Westover's memories growing up in a very conservative, strict, religious family in rural Idaho.  Her memoir is an emotionally wrenching, yet inspiring story of her journey from an isolated, rural life to her attaining her PhD, and studying at Oxford. 

Acceptable for Women

Oct 2, 2019
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This is Nicole English coming to you from Fort Hays State University for HPPR's BookBytes. This is a discussion of the book, Educated: A Memoir.

The book describes Tara Westover's memories growing up in a very conservative, survivalist family in rural Idaho. 

Her memoir is a wrenching, yet inspiring story of her journey from rugged, rural life to her attaining her PhD, and studying at Oxford. 

Educated - Difficult, Painful, Validating & Inspiring

Sep 30, 2019
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This is Nicole English coming to you from Fort Hays State University for HPPR's BookBytes. This is a discussion of the book, Educated: A Memoir.

Tara Westover was raised in a very conservative, survivalist family in rural Idaho.  Her memoir is an inspiring story of her rather heroic journey from a backwoods life to her attaining her PhD and studying at Oxford. 

For this segment, I would like to focus on the issues of gender.

Radio Reader Book Leader Nicole English

Sep 24, 2019

Born in Texas, raised bilingual in two cultures, Nicole is a second generation academic and folkloric dancer.  She’s also an assistant professor of sociology at FHSU holding degrees from the University of Missouri in Kansas City. Nicole’s interests range from  the sociology of dance, arts, and community to LatinX studies, and technology.  Her research interests include the social impact of the arts and performance, (esp.

Sequoyah's View of Death

Sep 16, 2019
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Hello, welcome to High Plains Public Radio. I'm Freddy Gipp. I’m an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma and my Indian name is “T’sa(N) T’hoop Ah(N)”, meaning Lead Horse in the Kiowa language.

I was born and raised in Lawrence, Kansas, where I graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Strategic Communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism.

How Does It All Turn Out?

Sep 12, 2019
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Hi, I’m Valerie Mendoza with Humanities Kansas with a book byte about Where the Dead Sit Talking by Brandon Hobson, a Radio Reader selection for this fall’s theme: Navigating Uncharted waters.

This book is a coming-of-age story about Sequoyah, a Cherokee boy growing up in rural Oklahoma in the late 1980s. Most of the book takes place when Sequoyah is 15 and has been in foster care for a few years because his mother is in prison for possession of drug paraphernalia and driving while intoxicated.

Culture-Crossing Teenagers

Sep 11, 2019
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This is Leslie VonHolten of Chase County, Kansas, with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.

Most of the books in this season’s Radio Readers list are about children crossing cultures, and the rough waters they must navigate to do so.

What Haunts Me

Sep 10, 2019
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Hello. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kan., here to talk about Brandon Hobson’s Where the Dead Sit Talking.

My problem is: I don’t really know what to say. It’s not the fault of the novel, not by any means. It’s well-crafted, beautifully written. But for me, it’s one of those books that as I turned the final page I thought: 'huh: the end. What to make of this? ' Yet, it’s also one of those books that haunts me, long after I thought I had finished with it. Given its title, Where the Dead Sit Talking, to feel haunted perhaps makes a kind of sense.

Displacement, Identity & Resilience

Sep 9, 2019
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Hello, welcome to High Plains Public Radio, this is Freddy Gipp, I’m an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma and my indian name is “T’sa(N) T’hoop Ah(N)”, meaning Lead Horse in the Kiowa language.

I was born and raised in Lawrence, Kansas, where I graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Strategic Communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism.

The Pleasure of Reading a Nice Story

Aug 19, 2019

This is Leslie VonHolten with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.

I loved reading News of the World by Paulette Jiles for a few reasons, but the main reason is so simple that I rarely credit books for this: It’s a charming story with a tender, happy ending.

My Obsession with Paulette Jiles

Aug 16, 2019
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Years ago, in high school and college, it was frequent that I would fall in love with an author.  When I discovered EAST OF EDEN, for example, I rushed to read everything Steinbeck.  I did the same with Kurt Vonnegut, James Lee Burke,  and Toni Morrison,, to name a few. 

The World of "News of the World"

Aug 14, 2019
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Hello, my name is Freddy Gipp from Lawrence, KS. Welcome to High Plains Public Radio. I’m an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma and my indian name is “T’sa(N) T’hoop Ah(N)”, meaning Lead Horse in the Kiowa language.

I was born and raised in Lawrence, Kansas, where I graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Strategic Communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism.

Get Your Books On!

Aug 9, 2019
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Hello, Radio Readers! It’s here – it’s finally here: our Fall 2019 Book Club series! Time for us to get our books on! I’m Jane Holwerda, from Dodge City KS, and, oh man! Is this ever some set of books!  Are you ready? 

We’re starting off with novels set within our High Plains region! The first, News of the World, is a  True-Grit type of Western by San-Antonio based author Paulette Jiles. The story unspools in that tenuous transitional time between open frontier and settlement in Texas back in the late 1800s.   A veteran takes on the challenge of returning a ransomed girl to what he presumes will be her caring family. Will the girl remember her home language, her kin? Will her kin tolerate her tribal ways? Then it’s Brandon Hobson’s Where the Dead Sit Talking.  Set in Oklahoma in the late 1900s, native teens, unable to find within their troubled families any seeds of hope and inspiration for their futures, turn to each other and towards the ghosts that haunt them. Hobson, himself, is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee nation of OklahomaDescribed  by Publisher’s Weekly as “a smart, dark novel of adolescence, death, and rural secrets,” Where the Dead Sit Talking was a 2018 National Book Award finalist.

Just a reminder that HPPR's Radio Readers Book Club's 2019 Fall Read starts in August. The theme is "Navigating Uncharted Waters —Past, Present, & Future." Book leaders and texts were selected by HPPR Radio Readers Steering Committee, and they all explore the ways in which our childhood and life experiences inform our world views. Are we products of nature or nurture? Many intriguing questions will be explored. 

Here are the books to be discussed during the Fall Read of 2019: