death and dying

Fifty Years Of Belongings

Oct 8, 2018
Lagunilla Antiques / Wikimedia Commons

Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas, ruminating on aging, death and dying for our Fall 2018 series.

In her memoir, Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?, Roz Chast illustrates the things so many of us wrangle as our parents and elders die.  

A Cabin in the Woods

Sep 26, 2018

This is Tom Weso, and this is High Plains Public Radio’s book club. In the featured novel for this program, Richard Wagamese’s Medicine Walk, the deep forests of British Columbia provide the setting. In those forests are cabins.

Last Words

Sep 19, 2018
Hudson River School / Wikipedia

Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas, here to talk about death and dying, for our Fall 2018 book series. 

In reading and talking about the books in our series, I’ve found myself thinking about that moment when we cease to be one kind of thing and become another kind of thing.

Outsiders

Sep 10, 2018
Posted November 24, 2016

Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese presents many lessons, and one of them is how it feels to be an outsider. All of us have this experience sometime, and for some of Wagamese’s characters, it was their permanent state.

The father-figure Bunky lives isolated in the rough backcountry of British Columbia. He is a classic loner as he raises the hero Franklin.

It's A Meaningful Discussion

Aug 27, 2018
Rembrandt (1632) / Wikimedia Commons

In the last part of his book Being Mortal, Atul Gawande addresses the events following his father’s being diagnosed with a rare caner, astrocytoma of the spinal cord. Questions of surgery now or later, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, assisted living or hospice created emotions that swirled through the family like a tornado.

Putting Death to Rest

Aug 22, 2018

Hello from Quinter, Kansas.  This is Valerie Brown-Kuchera, helping to pass on (no pun intended) some of the ideas generated by Being Mortal, the first book in our Fall Read theme: “Let’s Talk – Aging, Death, and Dying.”

The author, Boston surgeon Atul Gawande, discusses our culture’s approach to death and makes the case that we may have “medicalized” mortality to a psychologically unhealthy level.