Donald Trump

Grace Hood / Harvest Public Media

Employees of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s main research arm, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), received an email from the division’s chief of staff ordering them to stop publicizing their work.

“Starting immediately and until further notice, ARS will not release any public-facing documents,” the email from Sharon Drumm reads, in part. “This includes, but is not limited to, news releases, photos, fact sheets, news feeds, and social media content.”

Bruce Tuten / Wikimedia Commons

After a long wait that caused no shortage of nervous fidgeting among the ag sector, Donald Trump has finally selected a candidate for Secretary of Agriculture.

Several Amarilloans - supporters, and detractors alike - Amarillo are attending Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration ceremony in Washington today.

As the Amarillo Globe-News reports, a number of Amarilloans are in Washington D.C. for Donald Trump’s presidential inauguration – some to celebrate, others merely to speculate.

Tom Mechler, state chair for the Republican Party of Texas, arrived in the nation’s capital on Tuesday.

Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration and the GOP-controlled congress have pledged to defund Planned Parenthood this year.

As The Guardian reports, West Texas may offer a cautionary tale about what happens when the government defunds the nation’s largest women’s healthcare provider.

50states.com

As Democratic lawmakers in Colorado push back against the GOP’s attempt to repeal Obamacare, some Coloradans who benefited from it are wondering what it will be replaced with.

Chuck Grimmett / Creative Commons

The future of legalized marijuana isn’t certain as President-elect Donald Trump enters the White House. 

As The Economist reports, over half of the states in the union have legalized marijuana in some form or another. Pot remains illegal under federal law, however, so any pot shop could technically be shut down at any time.

IADA / Creative Commons

We’ve heard a lot of talk about how the Rust Belt helped Donald Trump win the presidency. But , as The Hill reports, it appears the Corn Belt may have been an even bigger help to the new president than their more industrial counterparts.

Marlith / Wikimedia Commons

Texas companies saw an increase in consumer spending over the month of December.

As The Dallas Morning News reports, economists are attributing the uptick to what they’re calling a “Trump bump.”

They say consumers are relieved that the election has ended, and they’re opening their wallets as a result. Many Texans also feel confident in how President-Elect Donald Trump will handle the economy.

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

Donald Trump’s search for a Secretary of Agriculture is drawing criticism from some important contingents within the ag sector. As Politico reports, it’s been six weeks since the election and Trump has yet to name his nominee for the position.

Trump spent a good deal of time during the election building a relationship with agribusiness representatives, but some of his potential choices for the USDA position have begun to fracture that relationship.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A scientists’ union, out of concern for employees of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has established a hotline for them to use to report political meddling.

IVN.US

A Colorado elector is being referred to the state attorney general’s office for investigation.

CBS NEWS

Since the election of Donald Trump, U.S. media outlets have often painted a picture of poverty-stricken rural voters, beaten down by economic misfortune, sending Trump to Washington in a Hail-Mary prayer for change.

But new research from the Urban Institute has found that only part of that equation is correct. While it’s true that Donald Trump was elected in large part by rural voters, most of those voters, as it turns out, are doing better financially than is commonly believed.

After several presidential electors in Colorado indicated they might reject Democrat Hillary Clinton, winner of the state’s popular vote, as part of a national strategy to block Donald Trump’s election, Colorado’s election chief warned that doing so could result in perjury charges.

“If Elector A writes down Bernie Sanders or Ted Cruz or anyone other than Hillary Clinton, they immediately cease to be an elector and they’re replaced,” Secretary of State William Waybe told Politico. “The difference here is you have perjured yourself.”

American Wind Energy Association

Colorado could take center stage on the topic of climate change under a Donald Trump Environmental Protection Agency.

Chicken farmers hope Trump will back regulation

Dec 13, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

Rural voters, many of them farmers, helped get Donald Trump elected last month, and now chicken farmers in particular are hoping that he will get behind Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyard Adminstration (GIPSA) rules.

Olivier Douliery-Pool / Getty Images/Bloomberg

Donald Trump has promised to reverse much of President Obama’s legislation from the past eight years. But Texas is two steps ahead of the president-elect.

Last week a federal judge in Texas halted Obama’s plan to give overtime pay to millions of American workers. This is just the latest blow to Obama’s legacy delivered courtesy of Lone Star judges.

AP photo

The Hutchinson News has published a different kind of Christmas list. This one comes from a farmer in Stanton County, Kansas, and it wasn’t written to Santa Claus. Instead, it’s addressed to Donald Trump.

Here are some of the requests of farmer Jim Sipes.

First, he wants the Trans-Pacific Partnership to pass. Sipes says the TPP would be “very good for nearly all aspects of U.S. agriculture.”

AP photo/Topeka Capital-Journal

The Sunflower State is making a particularly strong showing when it comes to filling jobs in Donald Trump’s White House.

As the Topeka Capital-Journal­ reports, there are more Kansas names being floated this year than in any presidential transition in recent memory. There have been at least five Kansas names speculated about for potential top posts since the election.

The Wichita Eagle

Donald Trump’s proposed tax plan may look familiar to folks in Kansas, reports The Wichita Eagle.

That’s because the president-elect’s plan is very similar to Kansas Governor Sam Brownback’s 2012 legislation, which Brownback referred to as his “real-live experiment.”

According to analysts, both plans include a rate cut for individual income tax. Both plans also require cuts to business income.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez / The Texas Tribune

With Donald Trump’s election, fear is running rampant through communities of undocumented immigrants across the High Plains.

“I think terrified would be the right word,” one Colorado Springs immigration attorney told The Gazette.

During his campaign, Trump vowed to forcibly remove the millions of people in the country illegally.

Meclee / Wikimedia Commons

As The Dallas Morning News pointed out this week, it’s possible that a Trump administration could cause oil prices to drop even further.

Trump has indicated that, in his first 100 days, he’ll “absolutely 100 percent” approve plans for the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to Texas. The problem with this plan is, it will only serve to introduce more crude into an already glutted world market.

KWCH

Donald Trump has named Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach to his immigration transition team, KWCH reports.

Kobach said the job will take some of his time, but won’t take him away from home much. “I've got plenty to do here in Kansas,” he said.

George Frey / Getty Images

High Plains energy producers who oppose curbing greenhouse gases can rejoice this week, their candidate has won.

Reuters

Pundits and political scientists are still sifting through data can explain how Donald Trump surged to the most unexpected presidential victory in U.S. history.

Has either of the two presidential candidates said anything about the Ogallala Aquifer?

As part of its ongoing ag reporting, Harvest Public Media reporters examine questions from readers and this is one of them.

We weren’t able to find any cases where the candidates specifically address the Ogallala Aquifer, but each has each spoken to sustainable water use - mostly with an eye to the West. (Neither the Clinton nor the Trump campaigns responded to a request for comment.)

farmanddairy.com

In the past, HPPR has done separate stories on where the two major-party presidential candidates stand on agriculture. FarmandDairy.com has published a side-by-side comparison.

news9.com

One consequence of the deeply conservative nature of Oklahoma politics: It can leave the state’s voters feeling left on the sidelines.

As News 9 reports, both major-party presidential candidates have been focusing on the cares and concerns of the voters living in the eleven battleground states. And that can leave Oklahomans feeling forgotten.

NewsOK.com

With the news this week that Texas may be entering swing state territory, you may be wondering how much more unpredictable this election will get. But, as NewsOK reports, Oklahoma won’t be turning blue anytime soon.

The state has long held a reputation as one of the nation’s most reliably conservative, and that fact seems as true as ever.

Lone Star State Lighter Shade of Red This Election

Oct 27, 2016
KQED

Texas, home to two of the country’s most recent Republican presidents, George Bush and his son, George W. Bush, and one of the most conservative states in the country, is a toss-up in this year’s presidential election.

KQED

Donald Trump may be leading Hillary Clinton in the polls in Kansas, but when it comes to fundraising, the New York billionaire is getting thumped.

As the Kansas City Business Journal reports, Clinton has doubled Trump's donations in Kansas. According to the latest campaign disclosures, Trump has pulled in only a little over $200,000. Meanwhile the Clinton camp has drawn over $400,000. C

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