end of life care

It's A Meaningful Discussion

Aug 27, 2018
Rembrandt (1632) / Wikimedia Commons

In the last part of his book Being Mortal, Atul Gawande addresses the events following his father’s being diagnosed with a rare caner, astrocytoma of the spinal cord. Questions of surgery now or later, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, assisted living or hospice created emotions that swirled through the family like a tornado.

Medical Problems Or The Meaning of Life?

Aug 8, 2018
Wyatt McSpadden

This is Dr. Phillip Periman. I am a retired hematologist/oncologist in Amarillo, Texas. I have been asked to review Dr. Atul Gawande’s  Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End published in 2014 and now available in paperback.   Two chapters, “Things Fall Apart” and “Letting Go,” first appeared as articles in The New Yorker for which Gawande regularly writes. He is a surgeon in the Harvard system in Boston.

Most doctors unsure how to discuss end-of-life care, survey says

Apr 22, 2016
istockphoto.com

From the Kansas Health Institute:

Doctors know it’s important to talk with their patients about end-of-life care.

But they’re finding it tough to start those conversations — and when they do, they’re not sure what to say, according to a national poll released Thursday.