Kansas COVID-19

Courtesy, Enrique Rodríguez Franz

LIBERAL, Kansas — One woman thinks the COVID-19 pandemic was planned, man-made.

A man won’t get inoculated because he suspects other countries are using Americans as test subjects for their vaccines.

Three-fourths of this focus group gathered at a Liberal community center had heard the shots might contain microchips so the government can track people, even if most said they don’t buy that myth anymore.

The City of Amarillo Public Health Department is currently administering COVID-19 vaccines to all individuals identified in the State of Texas Phase 1A and 1B Vaccine Allocation Plan.

--Phase 1A: Includes front-line healthcare workers, staff, and residents of long-term care facilities.

Corinne Boyer / Kansas News Service

GARDEN CITY, Kansas — In mid-May, Finney County’s top public health physician sent an email to state health officials repeating worries she’d made clear a month earlier to her local colleagues.

Finney County Health Department Medical Director Lindsay Byrnes warned that the coronavirus outbreak at the local meatpacking plant continued to put workers there, and the surrounding community, at risk.

Corinne Boyer / Kansas News Service

Kansas is one of 18 states that the federal government is calling a “red zone” because of increasing COVID-19 cases.

According to documents obtained by The Center for Public Integrity, the government classified states with more than 100 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people last week as “red zones.”

Despite that, three of Kansas’ 105 counties, have no reported cases of the virus.

WICHITA, Kansas — Fearing what the coronavirus might do to the power industry, six electric cooperatives in Kansas applied and received up to $20 million total in loans as part of the federal Paycheck Protection Program.

“It looked pretty bleak,” said Doug Jackson, the general manager of Rolling Hills Electric Coop based in Beloit. It received $1.19 million to help sustain 42 full-time employees.

Happy Fourth of July, High Plains. (Well, a little early, but IT'S ALL I GOT!) Today on High Plains Morning, I talked to Jill Bronaugh, the Public Information Manager for the Office of the State Fire Marshal for Kansas. She shared some great tips and reminders regarding safety for this year's holiday weekend. Not only do you need ot be mindlful of fireworks, but this year also has a lot of other risks due to the pandemic.

Corinne Boyer / Kansas News Service

DODGE CITY, Kansas — In the days leading up to President Donald Trump’s mandate that all meatpacking plants stay open, workers in western Kansas’ meatpacking triangle were worried that precautions now being taken aren’t enough to slow the rapid spread of the coronavirus.

“We're right next to each other in the locker rooms,” Brandon Vasquez said about the possibility of social distancing at the National Beef plant in Dodge City, where he’s worked for about a year. “The lunch line ... they put stuff on the floor where we should stay six feet apart. But a lot of people are not listening and there's nobody enforcing (social distancing) in there.”

Corinne Boyer/Servicio de Noticias de Kansas (Kansas News Service)

DODGE CITY, Kansas — Antes del mandato de presidente Donald Trump que las plantas de envasado de carne deberían permanecer abiertas, los trabajadores ya estaban preocupados porque las precauciones actuales no son suficientes para detener la propagación de COVID-19 coronavirus. Estos serían los trabajadores en el triángulo de plantas empacadoras de carne del oeste de Kansas.

Corinne Boyer / Kansas News Service

GARDEN CITY, Kansas As news of COVID-19 unfolds daily, so does the devastation caused by the virus. And a growing desire to help people hit hardest by the many ripple effects.