Ken Paxton

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to strike down a 2016 California law that bans state-funded travel to states with discriminatory laws — a list Texas landed on nearly three years ago after the Legislature approved a religious-refusal law for adoptions in the state.

Bob Daemmrich / The Texas Tribune

The attorney general's office is charged with defending state agencies when they are challenged in court. But Paxton will not defend a commission sued after it issued a public warning for a Waco judge who refuses to perform same-sex marriages.

From The Texas Tribune:

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton will not defend a state agency being sued for its decision to sanction a Waco judge who refuses to perform same-sex marriages.

After mulling the question for nearly six months, the nine Republican judges on Texas’ highest criminal court will not reconsider their 2018 ruling that threatens to imperil the criminal case against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced Wednesday that his office filed a brief with the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional.

Unlike other voting rights lawsuits filed against Texas officials in the past decade, the challenge to the state’s noncitizen voter-removal effort was settled relatively quickly.

In what state Sen. Angela Paxton describes as an effort to safely expand Texas’ burgeoning financial tech industry, the freshman Republican from McKinney has filed a bill that would empower the office of her husband, Attorney General Ken Paxton, to exempt entrepreneurs from certain state regulations so they can market “innovative financial products or services.”

Updated 4:36 p.m.

Attorney General Ken Paxton has filed a lawsuit in Travis County district court against San Antonio, its police department, chief of police and city manager, to require their compliance with Senate Bill 4, which prohibits sanctuary cities in Texas, according to a news release.

Texas Court Of Criminal Appeals Rules Against Prosecutors In Ken Paxton Payment Case

Nov 21, 2018

The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals on Wednesday potentially imperiled the long-delayed criminal prosecution of Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, ruling that payments to special prosecutors were outside legal limits.

Less than a year into his first term as Texas attorney general, Republican Ken Paxton was indicted by a state grand jury on three criminal charges. The Democrat challenging his re-election, Justin Nelson, has said that's the key issue as voters go to the polls starting Monday.

When Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his re-election bid, he highlighted many of his accomplishments from his years in office.

What he left out was his indictment on three felony charges. We talk to Texas Observer staff writer Michael Barajas about his case.

Then, a homemade political yard sign caught the attention of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. So much so, it was seized by police (11:00). And finally, here in Texas, folks opt to observe Indigenous People’s Day rather than Columbus Day (22:52).  


Leslie Boorhem-Stephenson / The Texas Tribune

Justin Nelson, a Democrat running for attorney general, is positioning himself as the champion of protections for pre-existing conditions, one of the most popular provisions of the landmark health care law.

From The Texas Tribune:

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is challenging the Affordable Care Act at a hearing in federal court in Fort Worth today.

Wikimedia Commons

Texas and Kansas stand to be repaid over $400 million in lost health care funds if a late-August Federal ruling stands.

As The Austin American-Statesman reports, a federal court in North Texas has ruled that the federal government improperly charged Texas, Kansas, and a few other states millions of dollars in Medicaid fees, in an effort to help fund the Affordable Care Act.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says he plans to continue his crusade to curb what he calls an epidemic of voter fraud in Texas, reports The Texas Observer.

Meanwhile, the Attorney General remains under felony indictment for allegedly violating state securities law. Paxton sent a letter to the chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Election Integrity this week, in which he outlined his plan to purge voter rolls of non-citizens and to ensure that voters aren’t registered in multiple states.

mollyktadams / Flickr Creative Commons

Texas may soon throw a monkey wrench into the works of a deal to save DACA recipients from deportation.

Some relief came last week for hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants across the United States who came to this country as children, as President Donald Trump said he would consider a deal to let these so-called “dreamers” stay in the country if Democrats meet his demands for a border wall and work to restrict future “chain migration.”

Austin American-Statesman

A new lawsuit filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton could open the door for nuclear waste storage in the Lone Star State.

As The Austin American-Statesman reports, Paxton is suing the federal government to force a decision on whether Texas can store high-level radioactive waste within its borders.

Jay Janner / Austin American-Statesman

A federal judge has now ordered Texas officials to create several plans to fix the systemic problems that have plagued the state’s foster care system for years. Some of the proposed fixes will be due in as little as three months from now.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The Texas Legislature gavels in its 2017 session today. To get the new session rolling, let’s take a look back at the biggest Texas political stories of the 2016 session.

James Nielsen / Houston Chronicle

A database has been made public that reveals the files of over 5,000 people who have died in police custody in Texas, reports The Houston Chronicle.

This week Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office launched an online initiative known as the Custodial Death Report database. This makes readily available the files that a police agency creates when someone dies in custody.

Dallas Morning News

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is once again facing accusations of fraud from investors, reports The New York Times.

Office of the Attorney General of Texas / KTSA

The State of Texas is suing the Obama Administration once again, reports KTSA.

This time the lawsuit centers around a new federal overtime pay law. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton says he’s “constantly” having to sue the government because he and his colleagues feels the Obama Administration is making new laws. And he insists that the Executive Branch’s job is to enforce laws, not write them.

Eric Gay / AP photo

Last week, voting rights advocates accused Texas Republicans of mounting a procedural end run around a panel of federal appeals court judges.

Denton Record-Chronicle

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and his wife accepted an invitation to dinner last week at the home of a third-grade transgender boy.

Amber and Adam Briggle of Denton invited Paxton and his wife, Angela, to spend a little time with them and their transgender son MG last week, to put a face on transgender issues.

Ralph Barrera / AP photo

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has sued a southeast Texas county that’s trying to ban guns from its courthouse, reports The Los Angeles Times

Patrick Michels / Texas Observer

The US Supreme Court remains evenly divided with four conservative and four liberal justices. This provides Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton with a legal method of getting his way relatively consistently.

Ilana Panich-Linsman / New York Times

Last month a federal appeals court ruled that Texas’s controversial Voter ID law discriminates against black and Hispanic voters. Now, reports The Dallas Morning News, the Lone Star State is appealing the decision with the U.S. Supreme Court.

KHOU

The 2018 midterm election could be an interesting one in Texas, reports KHOU.

Some Texan officials who will be on the ballot are already in a strong position. Gov. Greg Abbott already has almost $30  million in the bank. Other Lone Star lawmakers look less invincible. Attorney General Ken Paxton is facing federal securities fraud charges and is under criminal indictment in state court.

Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

Ken Paxton has been embroiled in controversy for months, but the Texas Attorney General doesn’t seem to be having trouble paying his legal bills. Paxton is facing federal and state securities fraud charges and is under multiple indictments. But, as The Texas Tribune reports, Paxton has received six figures worth of donations from “family friends” to help pay his massive legal debts.

AP photo

Amid the refugee crisis last year Texas filed a lawsuit seeking to block Syrians from settling in the Lone Star State. But now a federal judge in Dallas has denied that claim. US District Judge David Godbey ruled that Texas officials failed to make “a plausible claim for relief” from refugee settlement, reports The Austin American-Statesman.

Callie Richmond / Bob Daemmrich / Pete Souz / Texas Tribune

The State of Texas has sued the Obama administration 40 times since the president took office in 2008. All told, the lawsuits have cost taxpayers over $5 million. So, The Texas Tribune wondered, what is the Lone Star State getting for its money? Texas has definitively won 15 percent of its cases, or six of them. The state has lost 10 of its challenges. And the state withdrew eight of the cases.

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