KUNC

On this week's Colorado Edition, we talk about how to get a bird's eye view while in a windowless box. Other stories: man therapy aims to prevent suicide among men, the Colorado River Compact is broken and Colorado's dependence on the H-2B visa program.

Natalie Perry, a paramedic with Banner Health in Greeley, responds to all types of medical emergencies. But she recalled a structure fire where dogs, not people, needed care.

"Animals are brought out and it's kind of a helpless feeling when you don't have the training and knowledge to know what to do," she said.

This and similar experiences prompted Perry to create Project Daphne, a program that provides emergency medical services to household dogs and cats, as well as police dogs.

State Transportation Commissioner Rocky Scott says his lunch conversation at a Colorado Springs steakhouse took on a sobering tone Monday when the discussion turned to the state’s road funding woes.

“I don’t think we’re going to solve this before I leave the commission,” Scott said.

Three weeks after voters rejected two transportation funding measures, Scott and some of the other commissioners who oversee the state’s road improvement budget still sound resigned.

Early season snowfall in some parts of the Colorado River Basin have raised hopes of a drought recovery. But that optimism is likely premature.

In Colorado, higher than average snowfall in October and early November has allowed ski resorts to open early after a dismal start to last year’s season.

Two members of Colorado's Democratic House delegation are adding some suspense to Nancy Pelosi's quest to become speaker.

This week, Congressman Ed Perlmutter signed a letter with 15 other House Democrats opposing Pelosi's bid.

Coloradans buying their own health insurance might see higher premiums than last year -- but officials say those who shop around could save big in 2019.

Open enrollment for the state's exchange Connect for Health Colorado goes until Jan. 15. For coverage to begin on New Year's Day, a plan must be purchased by Dec. 15.

New cars sold in Colorado will have to run cleaner and average 36 miles per gallon by 2025 thanks to new emission rules adopted Friday.

The move was supported by ski areas and other businesses that have called on the state to take steps to combat the effects of greenhouse gases and climate change.

But some local government leaders and auto dealers in the state are afraid these new rules will have unintended consequences.

In early November 25-year-old Jose de Jesus Gallegos Alvarez mopped the wood floor of a pilates studio at The Club at Flying Horse, a private country club in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

For him and the rest of the housekeeping staff, a day's work involves a lot mopping, but also window cleaning and towel folding. As winter settles in, the volume of work has diminished; summer is the peak season for the club.

For Gallegos Alvarez, it was the final week of his eight-month H-2B visa.

The parents sat stiffly; some had clearly been crying. Their children, largely oblivious, scribbled with crayons on the carpeted floor of a Denver immigration court. In a matter of months, the judge before them will make 71 life-changing decisions.

Earlier this year, the Department of Justice instructed ten immigration courts around the country to speed up cases of families seeking asylum on U.S. soil. In Denver, that directive is being carried out in a series of group hearings, designed to decide cases in less than a year.

On this week's Colorado Edition, the midterms are behind us and the stars aligned for the Democratic party in Colorado; meanwhile we look up at the night sky and wonder… where did all the stars go? (Don’t panic, they’re still there - we just can’t see them because of all the lights around here.) Plus – what’s the impact of a shorter school week? Hint: It’s not as easy for parents to play hooky as they'd probably like.

Two Mountain West states are part of a dozen across the country that allow people to select non-binary gender on legal documents.

Colorado residents, who do not identify as male or female, will be able to choose "X" as their gender on driver's licenses starting on Nov. 30.

"It's really important that Colorado is now allowing another opportunity for male, female and non-binary -- people who identify as neither male or female -- to also have an identity document who matches who they are," said Daniel Ramos, executive director of One Colorado, an LGBTQ advocacy organization.

This week's Colorado Edition is devoted to stories of veterans and their families -- tales of torture, courage, perseverance and love.

KUNC’s military and veterans reporter Michael de Yoanna guides us on a journey that spans several wars, from Vietnam War to Afghanistan.

Democrats and Republicans didn’t waste any time choosing new leaders for the upcoming legislative session in Colorado.

It felt almost like a lively and cheerful family reunion when the growing Democratic House majority gathered in the Old State Library Thursday afternoon to promote KC Becker of Boulder to the position of House Speaker.

Ride sharing companies are making it easier for voters without vehicles to cast ballots on Election Day.

Uber and Lyft are offering free and discounted rides to polling locations in Colorado.

There are some strings attached to the deals, though. A ride with Uber is free if the fare doesn’t exceed $10. And the Lyft rides are being offered to most voters at a 50 percent discount. An Uber spokesman said the company is paying the drivers for rides they give to the polls.

Just before Christmas in 2017 an explosion at an oil and gas site was reported in Windsor. You may not remember it; no homes were damaged, and while one worker was badly burned, no one died.

But recently released recordings from dispatch that night, plus interviews with those close to the incident, show the small Northern Colorado community just barely avoided a disaster.

Our partners at Guns & America wanted to better understand crimes involving guns in Colorado, so they analyzed 15 years worth of crime data , sent into the state by dozens of law enforcement agencies. Within that dataset, assaults and robberies are the offenses that included "firearm"' as a subcategory.

A new poll from the University of Colorado reveals what voters think of new oil and gas setbacks, a tax increase for education and their choices for governor.

The Rocky Mountain News. The South Idaho Press. The Lone Peak New Utah.

These long-gone newspapers range from a Pulitzer-winning metro-area daily to small weeklies in rural towns. All are victims of an ongoing trend that’s pummeling the local American newspaper.

The candidates for state treasurer have largely stayed clear of the spotlight this election season. Colorado’s current treasurer, Republican Walker Stapleton, is term-limited and running for governor.

Democrat Dave Young is a state representative from Greeley and former math teacher. Republican Brian Watson is a real estate investor with no political experience.

He owns a small business that does contract work for some of Colorado’s largest oil and gas companies. She runs a marketing firm from home and lives within a half-mile of three well pads.

She’s voting yes on Proposition 112. He’s voting no.

The state's gubernatorial race grew a bit more heated Wednesday night on a debate stage at Colorado State University.

Republican candidate Walker Stapleton ignored the moderators' questions about statewide issues late in the debate as he repeatedly criticized Democrat Jared Polis for an incident that occurred nearly 20 years ago.

There are several Senate seats up for grabs this November at Colorado’s statehouse. KUNC’s Desmond O’Boyle sat down with Robert Duffy, a professor at Colorado State University’s political science department to discuss what’s at stake this fall.

Walker Stapleton and Jared Polis are on their final push in the battle to become Colorado's next governor. They're in the middle of a series of debates around the state, just in time for ballots to start arriving in mailboxes next week. Many Republicans and Democrats may have already made up their minds, but there are wild cards still in play, including the impact of unaffiliated voters and fallout over the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Robert Wideman adjusts his glasses and runs his hand through his gray hair. He's sitting at his desk in his Fort Collins home looking at a grainy, sound-less film.

"I've never seen this," Wideman said. "Never."

It's from March 4, 1973. That's the day that Wideman and dozens of other prisoners of war were released in Hanoi, North Vietnam. KUNC found the rare historical footage in reporting this story.

Colorado's gubernatorial candidates didn't need to say a single word Friday night on the downtown Denver debate stage to start drawing a contrast with one another.

Democratic candidate Jared Polis walked onto the stage wearing blue tennis shoes, while Republican Walker Stapleton wore shiny black dress shoes.

The two men also clashed at the microphone when the cameras started rolling.

On this week's Colorado Edition, the Terminator throws his not-insignificant weight behind measures to end partisan gerrymandering in Colorado, and how diversity is creating big city problems for small town communities.

On a summer evening, police Sgt. Anthony Gagliano patrols the long, open streets of Fort Morgan, Colorado. He’s lived here for the last 16 years, almost as long as he’s been on the force. There’s one thing he knows sets apart this rural city of about 11,000: the diversity.

Democrat Jared Polis is leading Republican Walker Stapleton in Colorado's governor's race.

A recent bi-partisan poll of likely voters found Polis' seven-point lead is driven by his appeal with unaffiliated and female voters. The poll's margin of error was plus or minus four percentage points.

As election day approaches, national gun violence prevention groups are spending big on the competitive race in Colorado's 6th Congressional District, and on other tight races across the country, in a push to make gun control a winning issue this year.

There were a record number of flu hospitalizations in Colorado last year. More than 4,600 people were hospitalized due to the flu during the last flu season.

Several factors contributed to a spike in hospitalizations, one of which is the strain, said Dr. Rachel Herlihy, epidemiologist for the Colorado Department of Public Health.

"And last year the predominant strain was a virus called H3N2,” said Herlihy. “And that strain of influenza is really known to cause higher rates of hospitalization and more severe illness, particularly in older adults.”

Pages