Latinos

POR CORTESÍA DE ENRIQUE RODRÍGUEZ FRANZ

LIBERAL, Kansas — Una mujer piensa que la pandemia de la COVID-19 fue planeada, hecha por el hombre.

Un hombre no se inocula porque sospecha que otros países usan a los estadounidenses como sujetos de estudio para sus vacunas.

Tres cuartos de este grupo de enfoque que se reúnen en un centro comunitario en Liberal, habían oído que las vacunas podrían contener microchips para que el gobierno pueda rastrear a la gente, a pesar de que la mayoría dice que ya no creen en ese mito.

Courtesy, Enrique Rodríguez Franz

LIBERAL, Kansas — One woman thinks the COVID-19 pandemic was planned, man-made.

A man won’t get inoculated because he suspects other countries are using Americans as test subjects for their vaccines.

Three-fourths of this focus group gathered at a Liberal community center had heard the shots might contain microchips so the government can track people, even if most said they don’t buy that myth anymore.

They came from around Texas – dozens of college and high school age Latinos. Their message to political candidates: Listen to us, our vote matters.

Latinos seek help for mental health issues at half the rate of non-Hispanic whites. Yet when they do, as with other people of color in Kansas City, they can have more difficulty finding providers with a similar cultural background. 

Calls for uniting America -- and for gun reform -- echoed through the streets of El Paso Saturday. The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) organized a march a week after a mass shooting rocked the heavily Latino city.

Andrea Hernandez ended up in a McAllen hospital after a drunken driver hit the car she was in.

“I basically got amnesia because of how hard I hit my head,” the 22-year-old says.

Like many families in Texas, Hernandez’s family is from Mexico. Her father speaks only Spanish, so she says it was valuable that her doctor was from Mexico and spoke Spanish, too.

From Texas Standard:

When it comes to the Latino block of the electorate, you’ve probably heard politicians and analysts describe it this way.

Preparation Required

Aug 10, 2018
leocontent.acu.edu.au

My name is Valerie Mendoza and I’m Director of Programs for Humanities Kansas based in Topeka. 

My grandmother was an advocate for the elderly. She and others in our community noticed that those who were Spanish-speaking lacked services as they aged and in the early 1970s she helped to found a senior center for them where they could gather, socialize, and have something to look forward to.

Justyna Furmanczyk / Texas Tribune

Texas has been booming since 2010, and new census bureau numbers show that Hispanics account for a major part of that growth.

Lone Star State Lighter Shade of Red This Election

Oct 27, 2016
KQED

Texas, home to two of the country’s most recent Republican presidents, George Bush and his son, George W. Bush, and one of the most conservative states in the country, is a toss-up in this year’s presidential election.

African-American Monument Arrives at Texas Capitol

Sep 30, 2016
Marjorie Kamys Cotera / Texas Tribune

The main components for an African-American monument arrived at the Texas capitol grounds this week, reports The Texas Tribune.

The monument is finally being installed after more than two decades of effort by lawmakers. The memorial was designed and built by Denver-based sculptor Ed Dwight. The bronze and granite memorial will celebrate more than 400 years of achievements by black Texans.

Initiative Works to Support Latino Political Candidates

Aug 10, 2016
Ryan Poppe / Texas Public Radio

Latinos make up 17 percent of the U.S. population. But they only hold one percent of elected offices, reports Texas Standard.

And one group is hoping to change that. The Latino Victory Project’s goal is to develop a pipeline of Hispanic leaders to run for future open seats. These Latino elected officials will then address policy issues important to the Hispanic community.

Natalia Contreras / Caller-Times

I

n rural South Texas there’s a cemetery with names on the headstones like Davis, Baker and Harris. That in itself isn’t so odd. What is strange, reports The Guardian, is the types of names you won’t see. There are no Garcias here, no Lopezes or Hernandezes. That’s pretty unusual for a county where half the population is Hispanic.

Wallethub

Amarillo is one of the best cities in America for Hispanic entrepreneurs, according to WalletHub. The personal finance website conducted an in-depth analysis of 2016’s Best Cities for Hispanic Entrepreneurs. Amarillo just missed the top ten, falling at number eleven on the list.