literature

Science And Spirituality

8 hours ago
Edward R. Curtis, 1868 – 1952 from Library of Congress

You are listening to the High Plains Public Radio Reader’s Book Club. My name is Freddy Gipp, I am an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma, and my Indian name is T’san T’hoop Ah’n, meaning “Lead Horse”, in the Kiowa language, I graduated from the University of Kansas and head a small community development firm based in Lawrence, KS.

In her book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Anne Fadiman tells the story of Lia Lee, a young Hmong girl whose epilepsy was diagnosed in Merced, California.

Understanding The Hmong

Feb 22, 2021
Wikimedia Commons

This is Phillip Periman in Amarillo giving listeners a taste of what we are reading in the HPPR readers’ book club this spring. Anne Fadiman’s non-fiction narrative story of the cross-cultural conflict between a Hmong family whose baby girl has a seizure disorder and modern western medicine came out in 1997. Her title came from the Hmong name for the illness qaug dab peg(kow da pays) which translates: “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down”.

Health Or Illness

Feb 19, 2021
864px-Hmong-Mien-en.svgn Wikimedia commons

This is Nicole English coming to you from the Sociology Department at Fort Hays State University for HPPR's Book-Bytes....

This is a discussion of the book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down:  A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. 

Culture Is Our DNA

Feb 17, 2021
Wikimedia Commons, Laos 1973

This is Leslie VonHolten with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.

A lifetime of reading books teaches you that words—English words, anyway—are expandable, malleable vessels of seemingly endless meaning. As I read Anne Fadiman’s incredible book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, I kept chewing on one word in particular: Culture. Such a small word, culture. Interesting how in the United States, we load that small word up with so much  complexity and contradictory simplicity—with such respect and dismissal.

Quag Dab Peg – Kow Da Pay

Feb 15, 2021
Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I am Phillip Periman from Amarillo, one of the discussants for the High Plains Radio Readers’ Book Club. One of the three books we are reading this Spring is “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down” written by Anne Fadiman and published in 1997. This non-fiction book is about a Hmong refugee family, the Lees and their daughter Lia stricken with epilepsy, and the major family trauma and loss they suffer because of  cross cultural differences with the American medical system.

Spring Read's Second Book

Feb 12, 2021

 Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas.  Our Spring Read, Cultures in a Common Land, invites us to think about conflicts between our ways of life and the customs, habits, and traditions of others.  We began our spring read with Barbara Kingsolver’s Poisonwood Bible, a novel that plunks a 1950’s family from the American South into the middle of the African Congo.  Not versed in the customs or the geography of the land, and slow to learn, each member of the Price family adapts or dies.

Poisonwood Bible and Its Targets

Feb 10, 2021
Frank Hall, circa 1965, public domain. Wikimedia Commons

This is Mike Strong, in Hays, for HPPR’s Radio Reader’s Book Club. The book is “Poisonwood Bible” by Barbara Kingsolver.

The jobs of spies are justified by the stories they tell, even when the stories lie. They work best when your “customer” wants to hear them.” The oldest two-punch sales routine goes:
     1 – You have a problem.
     2 – We have the solution.

A Tale Of Two Americas

Feb 8, 2021

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver tells about Nathan Price, a 1950’s preacher who drags his wife and four daughters from Georgia to save the wicked souls in the Congolese jungle of Africa. It’s a powerful novel about politics, religion, sin, redemption and everything else that makes for great storytelling.

Congo as Setting

Feb 5, 2021
Leon de Moor. J Lebegue and Co. 1896 Public Domain

You are listening to the High Plains Public Radio Reader’s Book Club…. My name is Freddy Gipp, I am an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma, and my Indian name is T’san T’hoop Ah’n, meaning “Lead Horse”, in the Kiowa language, I graduated from the University of Kansas and head a small community development firm based in Lawrence, KS.

In Barbara Kingsolver’s novel, The Poisonwood Bible, we dive into a mixture of greed, ignorance and the conflation of religion, history and plight.

Saviorism and Entitlement

Feb 3, 2021
Wikiwant

My name is Jessica Sadler and I am a Science Teacher and STEAM facilitator in Olathe, Kansas. I am here with the other book leaders to discuss The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver. This story follows a family of Baptist missionaries from Georgia to the Congo.

There are many exceptional themes that can be found within this novel. Of them all, I resonated most with the theme of Saviorism and entitlement, both of which hold serious consequences.

The Big Man Upstairs

Feb 1, 2021

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club.

In The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, Nathan Price is a preacher in the 1950’s who drags his wife and four daughters from their Georgia home to save the wicked souls in the Congolese jungle of Africa.

Not a Fan

Jan 29, 2021
Leon Brooks, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Valerie a radio reader from Topeka and I just finished Genesis which is part I of the Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver. The book is part of HPPR’s radio readers book club this go round with the theme cultures in common.

First, a confession: I love Kingsolver. The Prodigal Summer is one of my favorite books. BUT this is my second try reading the Poisonwood Bible and I am NOT a fan. The book is about a missionary family of Baptists that go to the Congo for a year. It’s set in the 1950s and told from the point of view of the 4 daughters and the mother.

The Price of His Failures

Jan 27, 2021
Radio Okapi, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Phillip Periman from Amarillo, Texas. I will be one of the discussants for the Radio Readers Book Club this spring.  The first book we read, The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, published in 1998, has a story that resonates today. In the novel, the Reverend Nathan Price, an evangelical Baptist missionary from Georgia, takes his wife Oleanna and his four daughters Rachel, the twins Adah and Leah and their baby Ruth May to a remote area of the Congo.  It is 1959 -60 and the Congo is struggling to rid itself of Belgian rule.

Different Color Crayons

Jan 25, 2021

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver tells about Nathan Price, a 1950’s preacher who drags his wife and four daughters from Georgia to save the wicked souls in the Congolese jungle of Africa. It’s a powerful novel about politics, religion, sin, redemption and everything that makes for a great story.

The Limits of a Mother’s Care

Jan 22, 2021
Solis-Cohen, Myer, No restrictions, via Wikimedia Commons

The first time I read The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, 20 years ago when it was first out, it was a new bestseller, and I was a new mother. Of all the characters, I most related to, and was most perplexed by Orleanna Price, the mother. Though my circumstances were not nearly so extreme, I too felt lost in this new land of motherhood, this small baby wholly dependent on me. Those first few months of parenting are such a shock. Fortunately, my journey into motherhood was not nearly as dramatic, or isolating, as the Congo was for Orleanna.

Three Books in One

Jan 20, 2021
First African Baptist Church, Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club. It was fun to revisit The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver, an epic novel that spans three decades. The story begins in 1959 when Pastor Nathan Price drags his wife and four daughters from their Georgia home to save the wicked souls in the Congolese jungle of Africa. There are politics, religion, sin, redemption, family feuds, secrets and more.

The HPPR Radio Readers Book Club is an on-air, on-line community of readers exploring themes of interest to those who live and work on the High Plains. The 2021 Spring Read – Culture in a Common Land will begin mid-January with Amarillo’s Marcy McKay leading a discussion of the first book The Poisonwood Bible. Marcy is a life coach as well as an award-winning novelist. She loves writing AND helping others and lists several things she wants us to know about herself. First, she’s survived both a house fire and raising two teenagers.

The first book in the 2021 Spring Read – Cultures in a Common Land will be The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver. The book features the journey of a family headed by Nathan Price, a fierce evangelical Baptist. Reverend Price leads his wife and four daughters on a mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959, one of the most dramatic political periods in the African country in the past century. The Prices carry everything from garden seeds to Bibles believing they have what they need but finding something very different.

Cultures in a Common Land

Jan 18, 2021

Hey, you all! It’s 2021—finally!! And HPPR’s Radio Readers is back with a spring read for all of us!  What with all the lessons offered by 2020 (may it rest in peace), we’ve opted for a series of books to help us explore Cultures in a Common Land, as a way to talk about how to live alongside others whose beliefs and ways of being seem not to align with our own.  Know what I mean?

Today, High Plains Public Radio announces the return of our HPPR Radio Readers Book Club, with three new books  for the 2021 Spring Read, "Cultures in a Common Land." The on-air BookBytes can be heard during NPR's Morning Edition (7:44 a.m. CT) and All Things Considered  (5:44 a.m. CT), each Monday, Wednesday & Friday.

The holidays are near, which often means time for rest, relaxation, & READING! Here are a few holiday book ideas that’ll keep you on track with the upcoming 2020 Spring Read for HPPR’s Radio Readers Book Club,  RADIO WAVES:

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Tune in for an HPPR Radio Readers Book Club holiday tradition: the two-hour broadcast of a High Plains author's delightful Christmas story: A Carol Dickens Christmas, featuring a fresh reading by the book's author, Thomas Fox Averill.

BROADCAST SCHEDULE:

Monday, December 23, 2019

7:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. CT

Thursday, December 26, 2019

2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. CT

Just a reminder that HPPR's Radio Readers Book Club's 2019 Fall Read starts in August. The theme is "Navigating Uncharted Waters —Past, Present, & Future." Book leaders and texts were selected by HPPR Radio Readers Steering Committee, and they all explore the ways in which our childhood and life experiences inform our world views. Are we products of nature or nurture? Many intriguing questions will be explored. 

Here are the books to be discussed during the Fall Read of 2019:

Radio Readers Book Club Holiday Tradition Listen Now!

Dec 22, 2018

Tune in tonight for an HPPR Radio Readers Book Club holiday tradition: the two-hour broadcast of a High Plains author's delightful Christmas story: A Carol Dickens Christmas, featuring a fresh reading by the book's author, Thomas Fox Averill

BROADCAST SCHEDULE: 

Saturday, December 22th—  7-9pm CT

Monday, December 24th— 7-9pm CT

Tune in tonight for an HPPR Radio Readers Book Club holiday tradition: the two-hour broadcast of a High Plains author's delightful Christmas story: A Carol Dickens Christmas, featuring a fresh reading by the book's author, Thomas Fox Averill

BROADCAST SCHEDULE: 

Saturday, December 22th—  7-9pm CT

Monday, December 24th— 7-9pm CT

Texas Panhandle Poet Wins Prestigious Literary Prize

Jun 12, 2018
Chera Miller

A poet from the Texas Panhandle has brought home one of the most prestigious poetry awards in the American West.

Chera Hammons is the winner of the PEN Southwest Poetry Award for her book, The Traveler’s Guide to Bomb City. Judge Allison Adelle Hedge Coke called Hammons’s book an “astute take on life on the Southern Plains,” adding “we are the better for [this book] being here.”

So what does HPPR Radio Readers Book Club's 2018 Spring Read have in store? 

Here's more info about all four books! 

Christmas Book Ideas For Fans Of High-Plains History

Dec 11, 2017

With Christmas fast approaching, you may still be searching for the perfect gift for the High Plains dwellers in your life. Don’t fret, this year marked the release of a number of great High-Plains histories that will make spectacular gifts. 

One release that got a good deal of attention this year was David Grann’s Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI. Grann’s book, a riveting work of history that reads like a crime novel, details the murders of Osage Indians in 1920s Oklahoma after oil was discovered on their reservation.

Farm Bureau recognizes "Book of the Year"

Jan 10, 2017
chroniclebooks.com

The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture has named its annual “Book of the Year.” As the Farm Bureau’s website reports, this year’s award goes to Eugenie Doyle for her book, Sleep Tight Farm.

A new book takes readers on a fascinating journey into the heart of the Texas Panhandle. In Walking the Llano: A Texas Memoir of Place, Shelley Armitage invites readers to consider the unique character and geology of the Staked Plains. The book is a treasure of photographs, anecdotes, musings, philosophical wanderings, memories, and historical facts, all told through Armitage’s engaging and heartfelt prose.

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