literature

Goodbye to Cultures in a Common Land

Apr 21, 2021

Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas, with the sad news that it is time to wrap up our  2021 Spring Read “Cultures in a Common Land.”  To think of the people, places, and ideas we’ve experienced by reading together since January through April is impressive.  I’ve been thumbing through the books and listening again to the Book Bytes on HPPR’s website, and I’ve recognized some personal growth, as I seem to experience, whenever I return home, after a good travel.

Power, Language And Stars In The Sky

Apr 19, 2021
Michael J. Bennett, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Thank you for joining us on the High Plains Public Radio Station. My name is Jessica Sadler and I am a Science Teacher and STEAM facilitator in Olathe, Kansas. I am here with the other book leaders to discuss Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder by Kent Nerburn. This is a powerful story written by a white man, with the content supplied by a Native Elder. Their journey takes place by traveling to many different locations enlightening the author and reader along the way.

Mike Strong, Author’s Collection

I’m Mike Strong from Hays for HPPR, Radio Reader’s Book Club.  The book is “Neither Wolf Nor Dog” by Kent Nerburn. On occasion I think of this book as “The Excellent Adventures of Dan and George - with Nerburn.” Kent Nerburn, the author, tells his own “swimmer out of the swimming pool” story as he is educated by Dan and George in Native representations.

Dan, in particular is instructing, Nerburn, a writer who is not of Dan’s nation, how to think about and see Native America.

Lost Reverence

Apr 14, 2021
United States Department of the Interior, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I am Phillip Periman from Amarillo, Texas and I am one of the discussants for the HPPR Reader’s book club. This spring we are reading “Neither Wolf nor Dog” by Kent Nerburn. This is a book I would never have bought except that it was chosen for this year’s read. Once I started reading it, I could not put it down. Nerburn provides a griping poignant look into the mind and heart of the American Indian. In doing this he shows us a rich and meaningful culture and tradition that we destroyed and lost as we settled and took the country away from its original inhabitants.

Why Fill Up The Silence

Apr 7, 2021
National Park Service; Photographer: D. Luchsinger, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Valerie a radio reader from Topeka and I’m in the middle of reading Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads by an Indian Elder by Kent Nerburn. This book is part of HPPR’s radio readers book club with the theme cultures in common.

The Indian Way

Apr 5, 2021
Gen. Quon, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

This is the High Plains Public Radio Reader’s Book Club, and my name is Freddy Gipp.

I am born and raised in Lawrence, KS and currently head a small community development firm called Lead Horse LLC. I am an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma, my Indian name is “T’san T’hoop A’hn, meaning “Lead Horse” in the Kiowa Language, and I graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in strategic communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism.

Don't Listen To Them About Women

Apr 2, 2021
Maria Melendez Kelson

Hello Radio Readers. This is Maria Melendez Kelson, a writer and writing teacher at Dodge City Community College in southwest Kansas. The parts of the book Neither Wolf Nor Dog I got most excited about are where women show up and seize the spotlight. This doesn’t happen often.

This 1994 book based on true events is by a man, writer and teacher Kent Nerburn, about a man, a Lakota elder who simply goes by Dan, who has asked for Nerburn’s help to write up his recollections and impressions about life as an Indian in contemporary America.

Jesus Loves The Little Children

Mar 31, 2021
Jim Bowen from Hampstead, London, United Kingdom, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club.

Neither Wolf nor Dog is a quiet, thought-provoking story about an Indian elder named Dan who summons white author, Kent Nerburn, to tell the story of his people. The dance between the two personalities and cultures is fantastic, and worthy to have won the 1996 Minnesota Book Award.

Leadership, Power, And Ownership

Mar 22, 2021
Leepaxton at en.wikipedia, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Thank you for joining us on the High Plains Public Radio Station. My name is Jessica Sadler and I am a Science Teacher and STEAM facilitator in Olathe, Kansas. I am here with the other book leaders to discuss Neither Wolf nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder by Kent Nerburn. This is a powerful story written by a white man, with the content supplied by a Native Elder. Their journey takes place by traveling to many different locations enlightening the author and reader along the way.

Jessica Sadler has taught third, fifth, and sixth grades in Lawrence and Olathe Kansas, holding bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education and special education. A STEAM facilitator with an ESL endorsement, Jessica has won numerous teaching awards, including being named a Kansas Asia Scholar.

Tension Required

Mar 19, 2021
Mark Dixon from Pittsburgh, PA, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

This is Leslie VonHolten of Lawrence, Kansas, with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.
I’ll admit to initially being distracted, and even quite annoyed, by Kent Nerburn, the author of Neither Wolf nor Dog. Why does he insert himself so forcefully into the narrative? I entered the book expecting it to be focused on the voice and experiences of Dan, the elder of the subtitle, which is “On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder.” I wanted more of Dan and his friend Grover. Even Dan’s  old dog Fatback. I was not interested in the author’s confusion, frustration, and whining.

Cultural Memory

Mar 17, 2021
E. Irving Couse (en.wikipedia), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

This is Nicole English coming to you from the Sociology Department at Fort Hays State

This is a discussion of the book, Neither Wolf nor Dog:  On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder, by Kent Nerburn

Worthy Of Telling Your Own Story

Mar 15, 2021
PC bro, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

This is the High Plains Public Radio Reader’s Book Club and my name is Freddy Gipp.

I am born and raised in Lawrence, KS and currently head a small community development firm called Lead Horse LLC. I am an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma, my Indian name is “T’san T’hoop A’hn, meaning “Lead Horse” in the Kiowa Language, and I graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in strategic communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism.

Freddy Gipp, born and raised in  Lawrence, KS is an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma. His Indian name is T'sa(N) T'hoop A'h(N), meaning Lead Horse in Kiowa. Gipp graduated from the University of Kansas in 2016 with a degree in Strategic Communications from the William Allen White School of Journalism. After serving as an intern for the Bureau of Indian Education within the US Dept of Interior in Washington, D.C. Gipp’s consulting firm Lead Horse LLC t focuses on utilizing Native American Powwow celebrations as an effective economic driver for urban and rural communities.

The third book in the 2021 Spring Read – Cultures in a Common Land is Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder by author Ken Nerburn.  In it, two men, one white and one Indian, one middle aged, one an elder, struggle to find a common voice despite their disparate experiences and world views. Dan, a Native American elder, leads Nerburn through reservation life and the majestic western Dakotas deep into the world of Indian towns and forgotten roads that inspire memories of Ghost Dances and Sitting Bull.

Secret War

Mar 12, 2021
United States. Central Intelligence Agency, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

This is Mike Strong, in Hays, for HPPR Radio Reader’s Book Club  The book is “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down” by Anne Fadiman.

In 1979, three years after a failed previous escape and three years before Lia was born to the Lees, her family was part of a group of some 400 Hmong who escaped westward to Thailand, as their Vietnamese captors pursued them, setting fires and land mines. From there they emigrated to the US. Some 150,00 Hmong overall escaped the Vietnamese occupiers and the Pathet Lao.

Superstitions

Mar 10, 2021
Christopher Michel, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

This is Mike Strong, in Hays, for HPPR Radio Reader’s Book Club. The book is “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down” by Anne Fadiman

For me, the “nut” of Anne Fadiman’s story of Lia Lee, a child she met only after Lia was in a persistent vegetative state, the “nut” is the community of which Lia is a part, though she is not conscious of any of them.

The Most Important Factor

Mar 8, 2021
King of Hearts, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

This spring the HPPR readers’ book club is reading Anne Fadiman’s “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down”. I am Phillip Periman in Amarillo here to give you a little background on this narrative, non-fiction book which was published in 1997 and is the story of the cross-cultural conflict between modern American medicine and a family of refugee Hmong whose baby daughter Lia had a seizure disorder. The child had 17 admissions and over 100 clinic visits to the Merced medical community between the ages of three months and four year.

Medications Only One Hurdle

Mar 5, 2021
Credit: NIAID, CC BY 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Valerie a radio reader from Topeka and I’m in the middle of reading The Spirit Catches you and you Fall Down: a Hmong Child, Her American Doctors and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. This book is part of HPPRs Radio Readers Book Club this go round with the theme Cultures in a Common Land.

Most of this book is about the clash of cultures and outlook towards healing and spirituality. Interestingly, I could totally relate to the Hmong point of view, as opposed to the American doctors.

Each Culture Has Own Interest

Mar 3, 2021
Marco Schmidt [1], CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Thank you for joining us on the High Plains Public Radio Station. My name is Jessica Sadler, and I am a Science Teacher and STEAM facilitator in Olathe, Kansas. I am here with the other book leaders to discuss When the Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman. For all initial appearances this is based on the true case of Lia Lee, a young Hmong girl with epilepsy and the battle forged by her family with the westernized world of medicine. However, there is a strong opportunity for learning more about the Hmong people and their centuries of history up to present day.

Medical Care Without Understanding

Mar 1, 2021
Wikimedia Commons

This is Phillip Periman in Amarillo speaking about the HPPR Reader’s Book Club This spring we are reading Anne Fadiman’s non-fiction, narrative story of the cross-cultural conflict between western medicine and a Hmong family(the Lees) whose 3 month old daughter, Lia, has a seizure disorder which in their language is called  kow da pays which means The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down. Fadiman uses this as the title of her book.

Maybe There Is Another Way

Feb 26, 2021
Xavier Romero-Frias, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I’m Marcy McKay from Amarillo, author of Amazon’s #1 Hot New Release, When Life Feels Like a House Fire: Transforming Your Stress. I’m excited to be a Radio Reader for High Plains Public Radio’s Book Club.

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman is thought-provoking and insightful. Even though it was written in 1997, it’s still standard reading for some nursing schools today. The book does a beautiful job of leaving you sympathetic to both the American doctors, as well as the Hmong refugees whom they’re trying to treat.

Science And Spirituality

Feb 24, 2021
Edward R. Curtis, 1868 – 1952 from Library of Congress

You are listening to the High Plains Public Radio Reader’s Book Club. My name is Freddy Gipp, I am an enrolled member of the Apache Tribe of Oklahoma, and my Indian name is T’san T’hoop Ah’n, meaning “Lead Horse”, in the Kiowa language, I graduated from the University of Kansas and head a small community development firm based in Lawrence, KS.

In her book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Anne Fadiman tells the story of Lia Lee, a young Hmong girl whose epilepsy was diagnosed in Merced, California.

Understanding The Hmong

Feb 22, 2021
Wikimedia Commons

This is Phillip Periman in Amarillo giving listeners a taste of what we are reading in the HPPR readers’ book club this spring. Anne Fadiman’s non-fiction narrative story of the cross-cultural conflict between a Hmong family whose baby girl has a seizure disorder and modern western medicine came out in 1997. Her title came from the Hmong name for the illness qaug dab peg(kow da pays) which translates: “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down”.

Health Or Illness

Feb 19, 2021
864px-Hmong-Mien-en.svgn Wikimedia commons

This is Nicole English coming to you from the Sociology Department at Fort Hays State University for HPPR's Book-Bytes....

This is a discussion of the book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down:  A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures by Anne Fadiman. 

Culture Is Our DNA

Feb 17, 2021
Wikimedia Commons, Laos 1973

This is Leslie VonHolten with another HPPR Radio Readers Book Byte.

A lifetime of reading books teaches you that words—English words, anyway—are expandable, malleable vessels of seemingly endless meaning. As I read Anne Fadiman’s incredible book, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, I kept chewing on one word in particular: Culture. Such a small word, culture. Interesting how in the United States, we load that small word up with so much  complexity and contradictory simplicity—with such respect and dismissal.

Quag Dab Peg – Kow Da Pay

Feb 15, 2021
Wikimedia Commons

Hi, I am Phillip Periman from Amarillo, one of the discussants for the High Plains Radio Readers’ Book Club. One of the three books we are reading this Spring is “The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down” written by Anne Fadiman and published in 1997. This non-fiction book is about a Hmong refugee family, the Lees and their daughter Lia stricken with epilepsy, and the major family trauma and loss they suffer because of  cross cultural differences with the American medical system.

Spring Read's Second Book

Feb 12, 2021

 Hello, Radio Readers. I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, Kansas.  Our Spring Read, Cultures in a Common Land, invites us to think about conflicts between our ways of life and the customs, habits, and traditions of others.  We began our spring read with Barbara Kingsolver’s Poisonwood Bible, a novel that plunks a 1950’s family from the American South into the middle of the African Congo.  Not versed in the customs or the geography of the land, and slow to learn, each member of the Price family adapts or dies.

Poisonwood Bible and Its Targets

Feb 10, 2021
Frank Hall, circa 1965, public domain. Wikimedia Commons

This is Mike Strong, in Hays, for HPPR’s Radio Reader’s Book Club. The book is “Poisonwood Bible” by Barbara Kingsolver.

The jobs of spies are justified by the stories they tell, even when the stories lie. They work best when your “customer” wants to hear them.” The oldest two-punch sales routine goes:
     1 – You have a problem.
     2 – We have the solution.

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