Native Plants

High Plains Morning doesn’t often delve into ethnobotany, but when we do, we make sure the sources are straight out of KANSAS! HPPR thanks teacher, researcher, and writer Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of Ecosphere Studies at The Land Institute in Salina, KS, for her time and insight regarding her work with perennial native plants and their potential as sustainable crops on the High Plains.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, we’ll dig into the benefits of making your home garden a welcome home for wildlife, insects, and other critters. By following a few rules of (green) thumb, you can create a hospitable habitat that’s a sustainable haven for those outdoor friends who bring beauty, nature, and interest to your space. We’ll discuss planting nuts, seeds, and berries; providing clean, chemical-free water; and considering adding a bit of shelter.

"Maybe seeing the Plains is like seeing an icon: what seems stern and almost empty is merely open, a door into some simple and holy state." —Kathleen Norris 

On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'd like to share a recent field trip I made in April to the Dyck Arboretum of the Plains in Heston, KS. This natural museum has held a special place in my heart for years, so I wanted to make sure the girls who help me in my garden were also able to experience it firsthand.

Let's talk about native plants, and what they can add to YOUR High Plains garden. Not only do these natural neighbors have what it takes to survive in our unpredictable climates, they also make a seamless habitat for indigenous birds and bugs -- many of whom are crucial to the health of our landscape.