KOSU

After a seven-week trial, a judge in Oklahoma is now considering whether Johnson & Johnson should be held responsible for the state's opioid epidemic.

The lawsuit, which is the first of its kind to play out in court, alleges Johnson & Johnson helped ignite the opioid crisis with aggressive marketing, leading to thousands of overdose deaths. The state is asking for more than $17 billion.

Changes to Oklahoma’s medical marijuana program will go into effect on August 29th, following new regulations passed by lawmakers earlier this year.

The grace period for medical marijuana and CBD businesses making or selling food products without a food license ends Friday, April 26.

Edibles like infused waters, brownies and candies are popular items at many medical marijuana and CBD businesses. The Oklahoma State Department of Health considers them all food products, and, under state law, anyone who makes or sells food has to get a license.

Millions of dollars to make more room in the state’s drug courts, mental health courts, and community sentencing programs could be a possibility under a bill now being considered by the Oklahoma Senate.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about Governor Stitt signing legislation restructuring the boards and commissions of five state agencies and giving him power to hire and fire the agency heads, the "Unity Bill" on medical marijuana passes the legislature and heads to the governor's desk and Governor Stitt calls on the State Auditor to investigate the Oklahoma Health Care Authority in regard to Medicaid.

Oklahoma medical marijuana and CBD businesses may need an $850 dollar food license.

Foods infused with CBD or THC, like oils, candy or honey are popular choices at dispensaries. Now the Oklahoma State Department of Health, which runs the state’s medical marijuana program, is reminding businesses that sell or manufacture those products that they need a food license by late April, or risk fines.

This Week in Oklahoma Politics, KOSU's Michael Cross talks with Republican Political Consultant Neva Hill and ACLU Oklahoma Executive Director Ryan Kiesel about the passage in the House of a bill allowing anyone over the age of 21 to carry a gun without a license or training, the State of Oklahoma loses 30,000 teachers in just five years and medical marijuana sales exceed $4M in January.

A new report from the Oklahoma State Department of Education shows 30,000 teachers have left the profession over the past six years.

The report seeks to explain what’s driving the state’s persistent teacher shortage while offering the agency’s recommendations on how to stem it.

Muscogee (Creek) Nation recently repealed a 2015 law guaranteeing freedom of the press. The tribe backtracked just before the new year, but free press proponents suffered another setback late Friday when Principal Chief James Floyd vetoed legislation that would have restored the independence of tribally-funded Mvskoke Media.

Twenty-one people were released from state prisons Wednesday after Gov. Mary Fallin commuted their sentences for drug-related crimes.

After a decade of improvement, a new study suggests the rate of uninsured children is increasing in Oklahoma.

Carla Burton wakes up every weekday at 4 a.m. to drive Lyft and Uber.

Then, after she drives for about an hour and a half in the early hours, she heads back home to get her daughter ready for school.

At 7 a.m., Burton starts her “real job” as an administrative assistant at Star Spencer High School in Oklahoma City.

When her workday ends in the afternoon, she picks up her daughter from school. Then she hits the road again, sometimes driving as late as midnight.

“I have to be out here doing this,” she said.

The largest group representing state government workers is preparing to sue the Oklahoma State Department of Health for $3 million on behalf of 161 former employees laid off during a financial crisis.

In November 2017, health department officials reported a sudden budget shortfall that led to the layoffs of nearly 200 employees and an emergency infusion from lawmakers of $30 million to help the agency stay solvent.

Oklahoma’s claim to the buckle of the Bible belt is widely accepted as true. But when it comes to faith and voting, new research shows more residents are letting their political values influence the church they choose.

At a recent weekly Sunday morning donut hour at Faith United Methodist Church in Tulsa, people are busy talking about the start of school and the college football season while getting their weekly dose of juice, coffee and donuts.