Robby Korth

Robby Korth joined StateImpact Oklahoma in October 2019, focusing on education reporting.

He grew up in Ardmore, Oklahoma and Fayetteville, Arkansas, and graduated from the University of Nebraska with a Journalism degree. Robby has reported for several newspapers, most recently covering higher education and other topics for The Roanoke Times in southwest Virginia. While there, he co-created the podcast Septic, spending a year reporting on the story of a missing five-year-old boy, the discovery of his body in a septic tank a few days after his disappearance, and the subsequent court trial of his mother. Although the story was of particular interest to residents in Virginia, the podcast gained a larger audience and was named as a New and Noteworthy podcast by Apple Podcasts.

On a personal note, Robby loves trivia games and won his elementary school's geography bee in fifth grade.

The fate of the four-day school week, used by dozens of rural districts in Oklahoma, is up in the air.

Parents and teachers in Oklahoma school districts with four-day weeks gathered at the state capitol Monday to ask lawmakers not to adopt rules they say would effectively end abbreviated school weeks.

Of Oklahoma’s more than 500 school districts, about 100 go to school only four days a week. The practice has exploded in recent years because of a change in how the state measures school years, saying students need to be in class for 1,080 hours rather than 180 days each year.

Thousands of gifted and talented minority students aren’t identified by their schools in Oklahoma, according to a report published last month.

Anywhere between 19,000 and 60,000 students – mostly black and Latino children – aren’t identified as gifted and talented, according to the report published by Purdue University’s Gifted Education Research and Resource Institute. 

Thousands of gifted and talented minority students aren’t identified by their schools in Oklahoma, according to a report published last month.

Anywhere between 19,000 and 60,000 students – mostly black and Latino children – aren’t identified as gifted and talented, according to the report published by Purdue University’s Gifted Education Research and Resource Institute. 

A third of Oklahoma schools’ performance is slipping, based on metrics released by the State Department of Education Monday.

Of about 1,500 schools assigned grades on the annual report card, 493 saw a decrease in their overall letter grades. Only 234 schools saw an increase in performance, while a vast majority had no change.