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Russia-Ukraine war: What happened today (March 4)

Yevghen Zbormyrsky, 49, is comforted as he stands in front of his burning home after it was shelled in the city of Irpin, outside Kyiv, on Friday. The United Nations Human Rights Council overwhelmingly voted to create a top-level investigation into violations committed following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.
Aris Messinis/AFP via Getty Images
Yevghen Zbormyrsky, 49, is comforted as he stands in front of his burning home after it was shelled in the city of Irpin, outside Kyiv, on Friday. The United Nations Human Rights Council overwhelmingly voted to create a top-level investigation into violations committed following Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

As Friday draws to a close in Kyiv and in Moscow, here are the key developments of the day:

Fighting remains intense in central Ukraine as Russian forces continue to bombard Kyiv in an attempt to take the capital. But their miles-long convoy north of the city still does not appear to be moving, U.S. officials say. In the southern port city of Kherson, Russian troops control much of the city, including key facilities such as broadcast towers.

Russian forces captured a Ukrainian nuclear power plant — the largest in Europe. After a massive fire was extinguished, Ukrainian workers continue to operate the facility. No release of radioactive material has been reported.

A third round of talks between Ukrainian and Russian delegations is in the works, potentially as soon as this weekend.

A new law in Russia threatens up to 15 years in prison for anyone deemed to spread "false information" about the country's military and its activity. Other penalties target calls for sanctions against Russia and calls for not deploying Russia's armed forces.

Russian authorities blocked access to Facebook, and Twitter is down for many users. Officials also continue to shutter critical media outlets, now including the BBC's Russian service, independent Meduza and U.S.-funded Radio Liberty.

More companies quit Russia. Google stopped selling online advertising in Russia across all services, including search and YouTube. Airbnb suspended operations in Russia and Belarus. Microsoft, Panasonic and Hermès joined the growing list of companies suspending sales in Russia.

In-depth

China and Russia are closer than ever. The battle for Ukraine could change that.

Race, culture and politics underpin how — or if — refugees are welcomed in Europe.

Ukrainians fleeing war — and volunteers to help them — fill a Berlin train station.

Arts organizations are deciding whether to work with Putin-supporting artists.

U.S. readers are searching for books about Ukraine; here are six to consider.

Earlier developments

More news from earlier Friday and more in-depth reporting.

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