© 2021
In touch with the world ... at home on the High Plains
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
KJJP-FM 105.7 is currently operating at 15% of power, limiting its signal strength and range in the Amarillo-Canyon area. This due to complicated problems with its very old transmitter. Local engineers are continuing to work on the transmitter and are consulting with the manufacturer to diagnose and fix the problems. We apologize for this disruption and service as we work as quickly as possible to restore KJPFM to full power. In the mean time you can always stream either the HPPR Mix service or HPPR Connect service using the player above or the HPPR app.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is featured on a new USPS stamp

Late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being honored with a new Forever stamp from the U.S. Postal Service, showing her wearing a white collar with her black judicial robe.
U.S. Postal Service
Late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being honored with a new Forever stamp from the U.S. Postal Service, showing her wearing a white collar with her black judicial robe.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg put her stamp on U.S. law — and now the U.S. is putting the late Supreme Court justice on a stamp.

The U.S. Postal Service recently unveiled a new Forever stamp featuring Ginsburg, citing her status as "a passionate proponent of equal justice and an icon of American culture."

The new stamp shows Ginsburg wearing the white beaded collar with an intricate geometric pattern that she said came from Cape Town, South Africa.

Ginsburg's "dissent collar" — a darkly formal and hard-edged version signaling her opposition on a key issue — became famous as the high court split over divisive issues, but the simpler white collar the stamp depicts was the justice's favorite.

As it announced the new stamp, the Postal Service noted Ginsburg's legacy of fighting for equal rights, including her "important majority opinions advancing equality and strong dissents on socially controversial rulings."

The Ginsburg stamp will be released in 2023 — 30 years after she was nominated to the Supreme Court by former President Bill Clinton. It features art by Michael J. Deas, a frequent stamp artist, and is based on a photograph by Philip Bermingham, according to the Postal Service.

Ginsburg will be the first Supreme Court justice to get a solo stamp issue since 2003, when Thurgood Marshall was honored. U.S. stamps have featured a number of other justices over the years, including William Brennan Jr. and Louis Brandeis — part of a four-justice issue in 2009 — and Hugo Black and Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr.

Other new Postal Service stamps for 2023 will honor author Toni Morrison, who died in 2019, and Chief Standing Bear, who secured a key legal victory in American Indians' fight for civil rights in the U.S.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Corrected: October 31, 2022 at 11:00 PM CDT
An earlier version of this story misspelled Louis Brandeis' last name as Brandies.
Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.