nursing homes

Nine nursing homes in Kansas and 14 in Missouri are among nearly 400 nationwide with a “persistent record of poor care” whose names had been withheld from the public, according to a U.S. Senate report released Monday.

The facilities are not included on a shorter list of homes that get increased federal scrutiny because of health, safety or sanitary problems.

High-stakes low-profile

Democrat and political newcomer Sharice Davids is leading in multiple polls and recent fundraising in her bid to oust Republican U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder.

Not so much in public appearances.

KCUR’s Sam Zeff explores her apparent lay-low strategy to win in a district that covers the Kansas side of the Kansas City area.

Schooling you on the candidates

Chast's Experience Instructive

Oct 5, 2018
Wikipedia

A hundred years ago the Sears and Roebuck catalog, in addition to ordinary household goods, carried numerous advertisements for coffins, wreaths, and clothes to wear to funerals. The average life span was short: every family had first-hand exposure to death and dying.

Sepsis hits nearly two million people in the U.S. a year and kills more than a quarter million. It’s a particular problem in nursing homes, where the aging, confused and immobile are especially susceptible.

In Kansas, scores of nursing homes have received federal citations since 2015 for practices that can put residents at a higher risk of sepsis.

What's the Problem?

Aug 17, 2018
The Green House Project

Our Radio Readers Book Club is talking about aging, death, and dying and I have something I want to get off my chest.  I’m a person of many projects and over the past few years, I’ve spent time helping some of the finest people I’ve ever known raise money to build a new kind of nursing home – neighborhoods or Green Houses like the ones Atul Gawande describes in Being Mortal.

Maintaining the Integrity of One's Life

Aug 13, 2018

In his book Being Mortal, Dr. Atul Gawande discusses nursing homes and why 50% of us will spend a year or more of our lives in one. The other 50%, especially if we are in the very old category, will live alone. Unfortunately, Gawande observes,  “We give virtually no thought to how we will live out our later years alone.”

The owner and operator of 15 Kansas nursing homes has consented to be placed in receivership after defaulting on payments to vendors and failing to meet payroll.

Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services Secretary Tim Keck has been appointed receiver and will oversee operations of the homes, which are scattered across the state.

The owner, Skyline Health Care LLC of Wood-Ridge, New Jersey, previously acknowledged that it had insufficient funds to pay basic utilities and food service vendors.

Kansas officials have received a court order Friday to expedite their takeover of 15 financially troubled nursing homes. State regulators say they need to move quickly to protect hundreds of elderly and disabled Kansans who reside in the facilities.

Kansas officials are moving to protect more than 800 vulnerable residents of 15 financially troubled nursing homes across the state.

The Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services is seeking court orders to put the facilities — currently operated by a New Jersey company — into receivership.

That would allow another company to take over operations pending arrangements to either sell the homes or close them.

Nursing homes in Kansas find themselves in crisis, say the people who run them.

Where to fix blame or how to remedy things remain matters of debate.

A parade of nursing home operators and their lobbyists pleaded with members of a Kansas House health committee Thursday to fully restore cuts in Medicaid reimbursement rates. They also called for pressure on Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration to repair a long-broken Medicaid enrollment system.

Pictures by Ann / Flickr Creative Commons

Texas is hoping to soon begin the work of cleaning up the nursing home industry in the state.

A recent AARP report determined that the condition of nursing homes in Texas was, on average “shamefully poor.” And, in a separate report from 2015, more than half of the long-term care facilities in the state received just one or two stars out of a possible five.

travischarlessmith.com

First rural hospitals in Oklahoma began to falter and close. Now nursing homes are in grave danger, thanks to the state’s economic woes.

The state may cut Medicaid again, this time by 25%. If these cuts are approved, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority is anticipating that 93% of the state’s nursing homes could close. If that happens, thousands of Oklahoma’s elderly could have nowhere to go, reports KJRH.

KUT News

A national advocacy group ranked Texas as the worst state for nursing home quality last year.  The Texas Senate is taking action this session according to KUT News.  A bill filed would revoke the license of any nursing home with three or more violations.

State Sen. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown, is sponsoring the bill.  It requires the Department of Aging and Disability Services to revoke a nursing home’s license if the facility has three or more serious health and safety violations.

kabc

    A Lawrence-based nursing home watchdog organization has released its annual report on the best and worst-performing nursing homes in Kansas. It’s based on inspection reports for the last three survey periods—roughly the last three years. KPR’s Bryan Thompson asked Mitzi McFatrich, of Kansas Advocates for Better Care, what differentiates the higher from the lower-performing institutions?  Listen to the conversation to discover the answers, or follow the links to read the report from the advocates.

Huffington Post UK

Overuse of antipsychotic drugs in some Kansas nursing homes endangering patients
Powerful antipsychotic drugs are used too much and inappropriately to manage the behavior of elders with dementia in under-staffed care facilities, according to reporting by the Kansas Health Institute. Kansas ranks 47th worse for use of these drugs. The drugs carry serious side-effects, and reports say as many as 1 in 12 elders taking antipsychotics die from use of the drugs for dementia.