Matt Bloom

Matt is a passionate journalist who loves nothing more than good reporting, music and comedy. At KUNC, he covers breaking news stories and the economy. He’s also reported for KPCC and KCRW in Los Angeles. As NPR’s National Desk intern in Culver City during the summer of 2015, he produced one of the first episodes of Embedded, the NPR podcast hosted by Kelly McEvers where reporters take a story from the headlines and “go deep.”

A true Hoosier, he graduated with degrees in Journalism and Spanish from Indiana University. He also executive produced the weekly podcast, American Student Radio, which still broadcasts every Sunday on WIUX 99.1 FM Pure Student Radio, winner of the IBS college award for “Best Large College/University Station.” Matt is a firm believer that everybody has an important story to tell.

When the package arrived in Holly Smith’s mailbox from the Windsor Post Office, it was falling apart. A rubber band had been wrapped around the box, barely holding it shut. The note taped on its side read “delivered to wrong address.”

Inside, someone had rummaged through the contents, taking a $50 gift card, Smith wrote in a complaint filed with the town of Windsor last year. The incident was just one of many, she said.

Starbucks in hand, Nicole Towne sat on the bus hoping to get to work on time. The recent Colorado State University grad had recently started an internship with the Town of Windsor. Keeping up with the shuttle’s schedule, she said, was a good motivator.

“I think ideally I’ll take it twice a week,” Towne said. “The seats are nice.”

Drivers tired of navigating traffic across Northern Colorado finally have a new option. A first-of-its-kind public bus route opens its doors to riders today, connecting Fort Collins, Greeley and Windsor.

When Peter Bouckaert started at New Belgium in the late 1990s, the company was a small, boutique brewery making its way in Fort Collins. He was employee No. 33. During his time there, Bouckaert crafted some of its most beloved brews, including La Folie, French for "the folly."

Now, he and hundreds of other current and former employees face a decision: to sell or not to sell one of the largest independent craft breweries in the country.

State oil and gas regulators adopted new safety rules on Thursday requiring the locations of thousands of underground oil and gas pipelines across Colorado to be published online for the public to see.

The move, regulators say, will help inform residents of industrial operations near their homes and prevent future accidents involving oil and gas equipment.

Colorado oil and gas operators could see tighter requirements around abandoning, testing and disclosing information for thousands of underground pipelines across the state after a public hearing in Greeley this week.

There's been a lot of hubbub about a recent study on the health risks of living near oil and gas. 

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission announced it would take "immediate action" to review new permits for wells within 2,000 feet of homes. A new attack ad calls the research "junk science" and "fearmongering."  

But what did that study actually say? We took a closer look at some of the details.

Federal investigators released a highly-anticipated summary of the 2017 explosion in Firestone on Tuesday, prompting statements of frustration from the family at the center of the accident and renewed calls for government action to prevent similar tragedies.

Colorado’s oil and gas regulators say they will start putting some drilling applications through a more rigorous review process after a study found people face short term health risks, such as headaches and dizziness, if they are within 2,000 feet of the wells.

The study released Thursday specifically found the health risks occur when a well is being constructed, with the highest risk coming at a time when a process called “flowback” occurs.

Updated Oct. 1, 2019, 9:28 a.m. ET

Half a dozen men in hard hats watch as their construction rig rises more than 100 feet. On top, an American flag flutters in the sun. At the work site in Adams County, Colo., northeast of Denver, the crew is preparing to close off an abandoned well.

Instead of drilling a mile beneath the surface to extract oil, they're about to rip pipe out of the ground. In its place, they'll leave concrete plugs strong enough to seal the hole permanently.

Update at 1:43 p.m.

The Deer Creek Canyon Park fire in Jefferson County is 100% contained.

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office says area roads have been reopened to residents. Fire crews are still working the blaze and smoke is still visible.

Half a dozen men in hard hats watched as their drill rig rose more than 100 feet high. On top, an American flag fluttered in the sun. At the work site just east of Interstate 25 in Adams County, the crew was preparing for the start of an unusual job.

Instead of drilling a mile beneath the surface to extract oil, they were about to rip a well out of the ground. In its place, they'd leave cement plugs strong enough to seal the hole for thousands of years.

Tensions between oil and gas companies and communities along the Front Range are heating up again. So far this year, at least eight cities and counties have temporarily stopped processing new drilling permits in the wake of a new state law. The latest is Boulder County, where commissioners will hear public testimony on Tuesday on a new nine-month moratorium.

As climate scientists sound the alarm on the effects of rising global temperatures, many of Colorado's electric utilities are shifting their focus to a popular and potentially profitable goal: zero-carbon.

But they're also stuck with one important question: How do they actually get there?

The Colorado House passed a major overhaul of oil and gas regulations in a final hearing Friday morning, sending the legislation back to the full Senate one last time to approve amendments.

Lawmakers voted 36-28 to approve Senate Bill 19-181. One House member was absent.

A bill making its way through the state Legislature is challenging several long-standing practices within Colorado's oil and gas industry, including "forced" or "statutory" pooling.

That's when companies can drill in a certain area without consent from all associated mineral right owners. The practice has been around for decades, but is facing fresh criticism as Colorado's population balloons and oil and gas development creeps closer to neighborhoods north of Denver.

Updated at 10:57 a.m.

Former two-term Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper announced his 2020 presidential bid in an online video on Monday, pitching himself as the centrist antidote to a dysfunctional, divided Washington.

He joins an already crowded field of Democratic contenders including senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand and Bernie Sanders.

Inside a Denver bottling plant, Keith Villa watches as rows and rows of 10-ounce silver bottles whisk by, all filled with a golden-colored Belgian-style ale called Grainwave.

It looks and tastes like beer. But instead of alcohol, there's 5 milligrams of THC mixed inside. That's the psychoactive compound in marijuana that gets you high.

Thornton resident Jennifer Hubby is worried about paying her family's mortgage on time.

Her wife, a former Army medic, gets a monthly housing and education stipend from her GI Bill. Hubby said it's "very unclear" what's going to happen to that income as the shutdown — now on its 20th day — drags on.

At least 196 furloughed federal employees in Colorado have applied for unemployment benefits from the state, a number that will likely rise as the government enters its second week of a partial shutdown.

OPEC and other foreign oil producers said Friday they’re scaling back production by about 1.2 million barrels a day. That could be good news for oil producers in the Mountain West but perhaps not so good for consumers.

The discovery of potentially dangerous pesticide residue on marijuana has led to two product recalls in Colorado. The alerts have raised questions about consumer safety and the regulation of one of the state's fastest-growing industries.

The Rocky Mountain News. The South Idaho Press. The Lone Peak New Utah.

These long-gone newspapers range from a Pulitzer-winning metro-area daily to small weeklies in rural towns. All are victims of an ongoing trend that’s pummeling the local American newspaper.

The candidates for state treasurer have largely stayed clear of the spotlight this election season. Colorado’s current treasurer, Republican Walker Stapleton, is term-limited and running for governor.

Democrat Dave Young is a state representative from Greeley and former math teacher. Republican Brian Watson is a real estate investor with no political experience.

He owns a small business that does contract work for some of Colorado’s largest oil and gas companies. She runs a marketing firm from home and lives within a half-mile of three well pads.

She’s voting yes on Proposition 112. He’s voting no.

In addition to electing a new governor this November, Colorado voters will also decide the fate of 13 statewide ballot questions, including two specifically aimed at funding transportation projects.

But beyond that shared goal, propositions 109 and 110 differ greatly.