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Two naturalization ceremonies held today at Century II welcomed and recognized 175 new U.S. citizens who will be living in Kansas.

The new citizens came to the United States from more than 30 different countries.

Every college in Kansas is more expensive today than it was a decade ago.

Tuition and fees haven’t gone up every year — this year, the Kansas Board of Regents convinced most of the state’s universities to hold tuition flat — but that doesn’t change how expensive college has become.

The number of black farmers in the U.S. is shrinking — down to less than 2% of total farmers — and many are losing their land.

Members of the Kansas Black Farmers Association are working with the state in hopes of reversing that trend.

A historic steam locomotive is headed to Kansas as part of a tour to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Union Pacific transcontinental railroad system.

Kansas representatives in the U.S. House voted along party lines on a resolution Thursday that will allow the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump to continue.

Republicans Roger Marshall, Steven Watkins and Ron Estes voted against the resolution.

Sharice Davids, a Democrat, voted in favor of the impeachment inquiry.

Thursday’s vote approved the procedures the House will follow as weeks of closed-door interviews with witnesses evolve into public committee hearings and — almost certainly — votes on whether the House should recommend Trump's removal.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and presidential adviser Ivanka Trump took part in a roundtable discussion Thursday at WSU Tech about the importance of acquiring more skilled workers for the aviation industry.

Trump is co-chair of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, a panel that includes Sheree Utash, president of  WSU Tech. Utash said the board advises the federal goverment on how to improve the education, training and retraining for American workers.

Agencies across Kansas are warning drivers to take additional caution as deer mating season begins, bringing higher levels of deer activity.

Sedgwick County had the highest reported cases of vehicle-deer collisions in the state last year with 418 cases. Butler County followed with 384 collisions.

Shawn Steward from the AAA of Kansas says the average cost per claim from car damage due to animal collisions is nearly $4,300.

A jury on Tuesday ruled against an anti-abortion activist in his lawsuit against a prominent Wichita abortion rights advocate.

The Trump administration will add onto future ethanol requirements to make up for its waivers that allowed small oil refineries to mix less of the biofuel with gasoline. But the extra gallons may not ultimately make up for all the industry has lost.

The Catholic Diocese of Dodge City on Wednesday released a list of 12 clerics or seminarians with substantiated allegations of abuse against minors.

The diocese said five of the priests were assigned to the Dodge City diocese, while five others worked at some point in the diocese but allegations against them were made in other dioceses. Two others were seminarians.

LINDSBORG, Kansas — The city-owned utility here wants to sell more electricity to the 3,500 people in town.

So it bought a $40,000 Tesla Model 3 sedan. It wants to show that getting around in an electric car can make sense.

A jury is hearing arguments this week in a years-long case involving a prominent Wichita abortion rights advocate and an anti-abortion protester.

Mark Holick is suing Julie Burkhart, head of the abortion rights group Trust Women, in federal court over what he alleges was a damaging and unlawful restraining order against him.

Reginald Robinson is the new president and CEO of the Kansas Health Foundation.

The Health Foundation, based in Wichita, is a philanthropic organization geared toward helping Kansans live healthier lives.

Robinson is currently the vice chancellor for Public Affairs at the University of Kansas. He has an extensive background, including former president and CEO of the Kansas Board of Regents. Robinson also has served in several senior positions within the U.S. Department of Justice.

A Fort Riley soldier was charged in federal court today with sharing bomb-making information over social media.

The U.S. Attorney’s office says Jarrett Smith is charged with one count of distributing information related to explosives and weapons of mass destruction. It carries a sentence of up to 20 years.

The FBI says that Smith, during a chat on Facebook, offered to teach others how to make explosive devices activated by a cell phone “in the style of the Afghans.” He also talked about blowing up far-left radicals, cell towers or a local news station.

Wichita State University is partnering with Kansas State University to start a satellite nursing program at K-State.

The partnership addresses the rising need for registered nurses in Kansas.

The national average price for corn this season is back to $3.60 a bushel, about where it’s been most of this year except for an early-season spike ($4.16 in July) before the size and quality of the crop was known.

That’s not great news for corn growers, and for the ethanol part of the market, the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates are even worse.

During the settlement of the West, one in four cowboys were black. But their contributions have long been overlooked by the mainstream historical record.

One need only look at the backlash over 2019's biggest single, Lil Nas X's "Old Town Road," to see how overlooked black cowboys have become.

When Wrangler jeans teamed with the rapper, the company faced criticism over what some claimed was cultural appropriation—that the cowboy image was the province of white America.

WICHITA, Kansas — Smartboards have been replacing chalkboards in Kansas for more than a decade. Yet districts are still figuring out tech’s place in the classroom.

Large-scale commercial wind farms won’t be built in Sedgwick County.

To get the best college experience, live on campus.

Wichita — Sarah Stephens stands over a brightly lit table in a detached garage-turned-grow shed as she trims away unnecessary leaves from a recently harvested hemp plant.

When she’s finished, only the floral material of the plant will be left. The flowers will eventually be processed into CBD oil.

“We started out with not a ton of knowledge about it,” Michael Stephens, Sarah’s brother and partner at Tallgrass Hemp and Cannabis, said. “It’s been a learning experience.”

Kansas junior college football plays in the big time these days.

The Jayhawk Community College Conference made a key change to its player eligibility rules three years ago that drew blue-chip players in from out of state.

The level of play shot up almost overnight, transforming at least one team from a perennial doormat to a national contender.

A task force begins work next month on updating the Kansas Alzheimer’s Disease Plan.

A statewide plan to address anticipated growth in the number of Alzheimer’s patients was released earlier this year but was never implemented.

The Cosmosphere and Exploration Place will hold events this month to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.

A new website tracking property seizures by Kansas law enforcement went live on Monday.

The terms for handing off the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility in Manhattan, Kansas, have been settled — even as the billion-dollar-plus research site remains under construction.

Vaping at Kansas schools is reaching epidemic proportions, prompting the Kansas State Board of Education to launch a concerted campaign against it.

“This thing hit us like a tsunami,” said Jeff Hersh, assistant superintendent at Goddard Public Schools. “Quite honestly it’s very alarming.”

Members of the group Keep Reno Heavenly showed a mix of emotions after the Reno County Commission denied NextEra Energy a permit to build a wind farm in the southeastern part of the county.

On one hand, all of its efforts had paid off. Members of the group had worked for months to organize and participate in public hearings, and they finally got the result they wanted — the proposed 220 megawatt wind farm with more than 80 turbines reaching 500 feet in the air would not be built.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment was awarded a grant by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to address behavioral health needs of Kansans from birth to 21 years.

The Regional Forensic Science Center is getting new equipment to help identify opioid drugs that are circulating in south-central Kansas.

Sedgwick County commissioners voted Wednesday to accept a $155,017 federal grant to pay for the machine. The Wichita-based crime lab will use the new device to streamline testing processes and reduce analysis time.

Tim Rohrig, director of the Regional Forensic Science Center, says the equipment will target the opioid abuse problem.

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