J. Schafer

J. Schafer is the news director for Kansas Public Radio at the University of Kansas. Before joining KPR in 1995, he spent 10 years as a commercial radio and TV newsman.

During his career, he has filed stories for nearly every major radio news network in the nation. This seems to impress no one, not even his mom. But then, she had hoped he would become a priest. 

In the fall of 2000, he worked for the U.S. State Department, traveling to central Asia to teach broadcast journalism at newly independent radio stations in the former Soviet Union. One of his passions is Kansas--learning about and promoting the state’s rich heritage, people and accomplishments.

A native of Great Bend, Kansas, he studied journalism and mass communications at Barton County Community College and at the University of Kansas. He was also an exchange student to Villingen-Schwenningen, Germany.

The pretentious “J.” in J. Schafer stands for Jeremy, but he doesn’t really care for that name. 

Officials with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) say a Douglas County resident is under investigation for potential exposure to the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV).

Specimens were sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for testing and officials expect to receive results later this week.

J. Schafer/Kansas Public Radio

An avid birdwatcher who's lived in the Flint Hills for more than 40 years says something strange has been happening.

Bones Ownbey, a 71-year-old ranch hand at the Flying W, says small birds have almost completely disappeared from his neck of the woods, near Cottonwood Falls, in Chase County.

Impossible? Maybe. But listen to this report from KPR's J. Schafer then... decide for yourself.

KPR News will continue to track this story for future developments. If we learn more, we'll let you know. 

Thursday marks the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings at Normandy, France — the pivotal battle that changed the course of World War II.

This week is the single busiest travel time of the year. The travel and insurance agency AAA says millions of Americans will hit the road, hop on trains or take to the skies to spend Thanksgiving with family and friends. Holiday travel is up from last year, and the highest it's been in more than a decade.

Small communities in northeast Kansas are bracing for a massive influx of visitors for Monday's total solar eclipse. Atchison County officials expect as many as 35,000 visitors.

"It is just a guess. It really is," says Jacque Pregont, president of the Atchison Chamber of Commerce. "We really don't know. I mean, we know there's probably going to be 10,000 or more at Benedictine [College], we know there's going to be at least 5,000 at the airport. Beyond that? It's all guesswork."