Kim Johnson

Kim Johnson is the producer for Texas Public Radio’s live, call-in show The Source. She is a Trinity University alum with bachelor’s degrees in Communication and Spanish, and received a Master of Arts Degree from the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin.

From booking music in a variety of genres for local venues to organizing and hosting shows, Kim is an active part of San Antonio’s music scene. She co-founded the local music-centric organization SATX Music in 2011, helps coordinate the city’s annual Local Music Week and books talent for the yearly, multi-venue San Antonio Music Showcase.

Kim grew up in Tyler and Dallas, Texas, and is the oldest of six. She loves cats, is an avid festival-goer and will annihilate any challenger in a game of Scrabble.

This post was updated on Monday, June 29, at 6:05 p.m.
 

Dennis Bonnen, a conservative Republican and Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives, is urging “so-called patriots” to wear facial coverings to prevent transmission of the highly contagious novel coronavirus and its disease COVID-19.


Pregnancy is already a nerve-wracking time for expectant mothers and families, but the coronavirus pandemic is taking this to a whole other level. For many, the momentous experience and joy of new life is overshadowed by fear and uncertainty.


Only "essential" businesses are allowed to remain open under Gov. Abbott's statewide shelter-in-place order to limit the spread of coronavirus. In Texas, that includes gun stores.


After being laid off or furloughed in response to the outbreak, millions of Americans are struggling to make rent or monthly mortgage payments. What's being done to help people facing housing insecurity and shore up real estate markets amid the coronavirus crisis?


With primary runoffs on the horizon and a presidential election later this year, will the way Texans register to vote and cast ballots be modified to fit our new coronavirus pandemic reality? What needs to happen to protect the integrity of elections amid the COVID-19 outbreak?


Families are scrambling to find child care amid the coronavirus outbreak, and the lack of viable options is hitting low-income Texans and essential workers hardest. 


There was a lot at stake on Super Tuesday in 2020, with a hotly contested Democratic presidential primary and several high-profile statewide and local primaries in Texas and Bexar County, respectively.


A new report by Physicians for Human Rights documents evidence of lasting psychological harm for migrant children and parents subjected to the Trump Administration's family separation policy, which was intended to dissuade migration to the nation's southern border.


Mexico and Canada are Texas’ biggest trading partners, accounting for $230 billion in 2018. After more than a year of talks, a new trade deal between the two countries and the United States could soon go into effect, pending Senate approval.


Ahead of the 2020 U.S. Census, a new state-wide collaborative aims to engage community partners to reach Texans that have been traditionally undercounted, including the 25% who live in hard-to-count areas.


Lawmakers get to redraw state and federal legislative district boundaries after every 10-year census count. A Texas redistricting committee is holding field hearings across the state ahead of 2021 mapmaking, including in San Antonio on Thursday.


Monday at 12:30 p.m. on "The Source" – An $11.6 billion plan to reform school finance in Texas unanimously passed through both the Texas House and Senate and is on Gov. Abbott's desk for final approval. 


House Bill 3, or the Texas Plan for Transformational School Finance Reform, includes $6.5 billion to improve public education and pay teachers, plus $5.1 billion to lower school district taxes. 

Conversations about building strong and economically robust communities can often be focused on bigger cities. An upcoming conference seeks to cultivate, innovate, and collaborate on ideas to improve conditions in rural Texas.  

  

When we go through the experience of deep loss after the death of a loved one, it might feel like our brains are being ripped apart. In a way, that is what is happening.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that shows grief has a physical impact on the brain.

The names of 95,000 registered voters were flagged Friday by the Texas secretary of state's office for what it said were possible issues of valid citizenship, prompting pushback and even litigation from civil rights groups. A few days later, the state office quietly called counties to let them know many of those voters names actually should not have made the list.