David Martin Davies

David Martin Davies is  a veteran journalist with over 20 years’ experience covering Texas, the border and Mexico. 

Davies is the host of "The Source," a live call-in news program that airs on KSTX at 3 pm Monday through Thursday. Since 1999 he was been the host and producer of "Texas Matters," a weekly radio news magazine that looks at the issues, events and people in the Lone Star State. 

Davies' reporting has been featured on National Public Radio, American Public Media's "Marketplace" and the BBC. He has written for "The San Antonio Light", "The San Antonio Express-News," "The Texas Observer" and others.

His reporting has been recognized with numerous awards. Davies was named the 2008 Texas Radio Journalist of the Year by the Houston Press Club. In 2015 he was recognized with two First Amendment Awards by the  Fort Worth Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The Association for Women in Communications San Antonio Professional Chapter honored Davies with the 2015 Edna McGaffey Media Excellence Headliner Award.

It was in 2003 when Republicans took the majority of the Texas House of Representatives. The GOP had already won the Governor's seat and control of the Senate. The House was the last piece of the state government to secure the trifecta that’s been in place ever since. Controlling all three vital centers of state power makes it much easier for the dominate party to pursue its agenda and essentially operate without aggressive oversight.  This was not unlike how the Democrats ran Texas when they had a power trifecta during their era of single party rule which ended in 1994.


Do you remember learning about Texas history in grade school, and reading one sentence in the text books stating Texas impeached Governor James Ferguson? Then we learned his wife MA Ferguson was elected governor years later — and that’s all we got about this very curious event.

When Texans head to the polls on Super Tuesday in 2020, the act of voting could be very different. Texas lawmakers are looking at bills to cut property taxes and boost school spending, and they're also looking at ways to secure elections in the state, particularly with Senate Bill 9. 


When we go through the experience of deep loss after the death of a loved one, it might feel like our brains are being ripped apart. In a way, that is what is happening.

There is a growing body of scientific evidence that shows grief has a physical impact on the brain.

Texas begins redistricting in two years. The process will slice up Texas into political districts. When the districts are redrawn to benefit a particular party, it's called gerrymandering.  Some say it's time to finally end this particular political game.

The next time Texans vote in a stateside election will be Super Tuesday, on March 3, 2020. Ten states are expected to hold their primaries and caucuses on Super Tuesday, including three big ones: Texas, California and Virginia. There will be a lot on the line for the national and local primary races in Texas, and voting could look very different on that day ... if Senate Bill 9 is passed.

Sixty-four percent of Texans support laws protecting gay, lesbian and transgender people from discrimination, according to the Public Religion Research Institute.

Yet a new report from Equality Texas details the many obstacles that still remain for nearly 1 million LGBTQ+ individuals living in Texas. What can policy do to change the future of equality in the state? 


A victim's forensic exam can be one of the strongest pieces of evidence in a sexual assault investigation. Why is so much evidence related to cases of sexual assault not being processed? 


The 86th Texas Legislature is underway and many are wondering if this is the session when overdue repairs are made to the Public Information Act, including closing one loophole that helps police departments hide what happens when a suspect dies while in custody.

 


As the U.S. continues with a partial government shut down over the funding of a border wall, President Trump took his case straight to the American people. But some believe Trump’s argument for the wall is at odds with the realities of the southern border.


Joseph Garcia sits on Texas' death row after he was convicted of the murder of Irving Police Officer Aubrey Hawkins.

On this episode of "Texas Matters," we talk to Garcia at the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in Livingston, just outside of Huntsville, where he is scheduled to be executed on Dec. 4. We also talk to Jeff Spivey, chief of the Irving Police Department, in remembrance of Hawkins.


On the third weekend of every month is the Austin Highway Gun Show, where there are rows of tables with vendors with guns laid out for inspection and purchase. Would-be buyers slowly stroll through the venue, gazing at the pistols, rifles, semiautomatics and shotguns.


When Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his re-election bid, he highlighted many of his accomplishments from his years in office.

What he left out was his indictment on three felony charges. We talk to Texas Observer staff writer Michael Barajas about his case.

Then, a homemade political yard sign caught the attention of Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller. So much so, it was seized by police (11:00). And finally, here in Texas, folks opt to observe Indigenous People’s Day rather than Columbus Day (22:52).  


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