High Plains Morning

Weekdays from 9:00 AM to noon CT on HPPR

High Plains Morning is a long-standing tradition at HPPR. A daily mix of singer-songwriters, folk, jazz, Americana, world, reggae, bluegrass, rock and just about anything else that you can think of. Add a few live in-studio performances, interviews with community partners, and news from NPR + regional weather at the top of every hour, and you have a great way to move through your morning!

If you'd like to submit music for consideration, please mail a CD and one-sheet to: Jenny Inzerillo, Music Director, High Plains Public Radio, 104 SW 6th Ave., Suite B4, Amarillo, TX, 79101. (Please allow one month for processing, and then feel free to check the status of your submission by emailing music@hppr.org.)

Scroll down to view program playlists.

Today's Growing on the High Plains will put a familiar, purple beauty in the spotlight: the purple coneflower. We've all seen them adding a splash of color to the region, ususally in rocky soil, lining our rural highways with a strong resolve and stiff stem. Take a closer look, and you'll find that this hearty wildflower is more than just a pretty face. In fact, these lovely perennials are a possible cash crop for High Plains gardeners due to their herbal and medicinal properties.

HPPR's Living Room Concert Series continues with our first shows of 2019! Don't miss the sweet harmonies and inspirational soul of Kansas-based En Power & Light, live in Garden City. Then, kicking off the series in Amarillo, catch The Division Men, a Texas-bred, husband-and-wife duo bringing "acoustic desert noir" to the High Plains. Read more below!

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It's a  new year, so what better time to start planning a vegetable garden? Today's episode of Growing on the High Plains will dig deep into best practices for gardeners in our region. While our seasons can be unique, there's one guiding gardening rule that always rings true: ROTATION! ROTATION! ROTATION!

During my internship at HPPR, I had the opportunity to speak with Joni Carswell, the CEO and President of the Texas-based conservation foundation Texan By Nature. Founded by former First Lady Laura Bush in 2011, Texan By Nature aims to unite business and conservation leaders who believe the well-being of Texas is dependent on the conservation of our natural resources.

All right, HPPR Radio Readers! It's time to crack open those mystery novels as we move into the 2019 Spring Read: It's a Mystery to Me! This season will surely delight with a huge list of stories, covering classic noir novels, true crime nonfiction, vintage whodunnits, regional mysteries, and so much more.

Today on Growing on the High Plains, we'll snap into an old Southern tradition that's said to usher in good luck for the New Year: eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day. While this folk custom goes as far back as the Civil War, being generally keen on beans as a matter of good fortune dates to ancient times. Tune in as we throw open the doors on this unique ritual and its rich history—and may it encourage you to cook up a batch of "coins" for your family on January 1st.

For local art that's truly out of this world, check out the new Galaxy Gallery in Lamar, Colorado. I had a chance to catch up with the gallery's owners/arts advocates, Vincent Gearhart and Robert Townsend. HPPR wants to thank them for spending time with us on the phone as we discussed their new space and how it serves the community of Eastern Colorado. 

Lock the doors. Close the curtains. Keep the lights on. And get ready for HPPR Radio Readers Book Club's 2019 Spring ReadIt's a Mystery to Me! This season will surely delight readers who love thrillers, true crime, murder mysteries, classic detective stories, and regional authors exposing the darker side of our High Plains home. Now let's all snuggle up with this hearty stack of books and try to figure out WHODUNNIT! See below for the book list!

Click here to see a printable, two-page Reader's Guide, complete with bios and books! 

To fir or not to fir, that is the question! While we're all pining for the impending holidays, I thought I'd share some festive wisdom about an iconic, annual friend to many High Plains households: the Christmas tree. Even if you're from an artificial-tree household, it's fascining to know more about the different varieites of conifers that grace our holiday homes.

DID YOU KNOW: Every 98 seconds, another person experiences sexual assault? Sexual violence affects hundreds of thousands of Americans each year. Services in the US are making progress — the number of assaults has fallen by more than half since 1993…but even today, only 6 out of every 1,000 rapists will end up in prison.

The long prairie winter is already upon us, and it can chill the hearts of some of us High Plains gardeners. To combat those cold-weather blues, today's edition of Growing on the High Plalins provides a little green for the gray days ahead. I'll explain how a windowsill of planted microgreens can be a delightful way to keep your green thumb agile. Plus, we'll look into the brief history of this recent phenomenon. 

As we waft through Fall, nature lovers across our region enjoy bearing witness to the spectrum of flaming colors splashed across the treetops. So today’s dive into a bright orange fruit, about which many of you might not be too familiar, will certainly accessorize well with our High Plains autumn hues. Persimmons, whose name translates to “food of the gods” in Latin, grows best in warm, dry climates. If you’re lucky enough to have them available in your local produce section, you’re most likely looking at Japanese persimmons.

On today's Growing on the High Plains, we celebrate Thanksgiving, so I thought it would be wise to spend the show reflecting on a few things for which all gardeners in our region can be grateful. From full, Fall foliage to the season's blazing crimson and golden leaves, there is so much we can cherish after a summer full of rain with plentiful sunshine to follow. On behalf of the entire HPPR family, we want to wish all of our listeners a peaceful, safe, and warm holiday. Happy Thanksgiving! 

Much thanks to Garden City’s own Olivia Hanigan, a gifted high school student who was recently selected as one of 45 international World Science Scholars. I was delighted to speak with her about this incredible achievement over the phone, and the interview aired on High Plains Morning today.

Don't miss the Incendiary Kid, Dana Cooper, LIVE IN AMARILLO. This High Plains favorite is back in the USA after a couple of months in Canada and Ireland, and HPPR's Living Room Concert Series is thrilled to have him back in our region for a fabulous night of folk music and storytelling. 

Have you ever wondered what makes the leaves turn from green to gold in Autumn? Well, today on Growing on the High Plains, we'll take a trip to New England and visit the astonishing color show provided by the regional trees and shrubbery. Tune in to find out more regarding the science behind the faded shades of Spring as they break into the blaringly-bright hues of Fall.

Today’s edition of Growing on the High Plains whisks us off to the Italian countryside for a visit near the medieval and Renaissance hill town of Montepulciano. Nestled in the Italian province of Siena in southern Tuscany, one can find a wondrous garden at farm estate of Villa La Foce. The villa was built in the late 15th century as a hospice for traveling pilgrims and merchants.

Established by the writer Dame Iris Origo and her husband Antonio Origo, the villa was consistently used to shelter refugee children and assisted many escaped Allied prisoners of war and partisans during World War II, in defiance of Italy's fascist regime and Nazi occupation forces.

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Thanks to Dr. Daniel Helbert for stopping by High Plains Morning today to explains the particulars of tonight's Haiku Death Match

From 7 to 9pm on Friday, November 2nd (TONIGHT!), meet a motley crew of Panhandle poets at the Evocation Coffee Roastery (2300 SW 7th Ave., Amarillo) for a serious slam of 5-7-5'ers. That's right: you'll go head to head with other haikus, so bring your best and get ready to throw down.

It might seem odd to be talking about melons at this late season, but I assure you this installment of Growing on the High Plains will roll right along with this Halloween week. Today I'll share some insight (and secrets) about the hearty, hydrating casaba melon. Indeed it is a winter melon, so it's ripe for discussion on this first day of November.

Thanks so much to Katherine Stribling for stopping by HPPR Studios in Amarillo today to chat about this weekend's exciting concet. The Amarillo Youth Choirs will present the Vienna Boys Choir in concert on Saturday, November 3 at 8:00 p.m. The concert will be held at the Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts and tickets are available online here.

Today, Addy from Six Car Pub & Brewery stopped by to tell us about "the funnest run you'll never remember!"  They're hosting the Downtown Draft Dash on Saturday, Oct. 26th from 3p - 6p.  It'll be at the brewery (625 S.

Thanks so much to Evgeny Zvonnikov for stopping by High Plains Morning to remind folks about the upcoming Season Opening Concert for the Harrington String Quartet on Friday, November 9th at the Amarillo Botanical Gardens. 

Hear all of the details in our interview below:

Join music instructor Amy White and the many students from across Amarillo performing at the 2018 Yamaha Clavinova Festival & Book Fair. High Plains Morning was thrilled to welcome her back, as well as two of her performers at this year’s celebration: Emma & Ella Mullin.

It's almost Halloween, so I thought I'd spend this week's edition of Growing on the High Plains prattling on about an October tradition: pumpkins! From tiny, white and smooth to huge, gray and bumpy, pumpkins these days are hardly limited to the traditional orange orbs of yore.

Thanks so much to Valerie Brown-Kuchera of HPPR's Little Spouse on the Prairie for her thoughts after a FULL YEAR of writing and producing her regional feature for HPPR. Plus, she was just awarded Honorable Mention from the Kansas Association of Broadcasters!  

Times are tough for many of our area residents. However, don't just sit around and STEW about it! Make a direct impact at this year's EMPTY BOWLS in Amarillo, happening Thursday, Oct. 25th at the Southwest Church of Christ (4515 Cornell St.).  For a $10 donation, you can choose a handmade ceramic bowl keepsake, designed and donated by local potters, and slurp to your heart's content—and it's all for a great cause.

There will be up to 40 different soups, stews, chowders, chilis, and more. This year, your donation will support Snack Pack 4 Kids, which provides weekend sustenance for kids facing food insecurity over the weekend.  

They say good things come to those who wait. On today's Growing on the High Plains, I'd like to discuss a biennial for which many a gardener has been very patient. I'm talking about Lunaria annua, also known as honesty or money plant. While biennials typically take a couple years to crop up, this one is well worth the wait. 

By popular request, we have wrangled THE RIFTERS from their NM home. They'll be LIVE in Amarillo at our next HPPR Living Room Concert. You'll adore their Southwestern folk-Americana from the Rio Grande watershed, so MARK YOUR CALENDAR!

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