downtown development

Jonathan Baker

Shortly after noon on Wednesday, a large group gathered in the offices of CORE construction in downtown Amarillo to hear the announcement of a major new hotel development.

The Barfield Building, built in 1927, has been housing only pigeons for many years. Soon, the Barfield will be brought back to life, through the efforts of local developers, along with architects, designers and hoteliers from Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Dallas.

skyscrapercity.com / Wikimedia Commons

The former Chase Tower in downtown Amarillo has a new resident bank and namesake. Going forward, the tallest building between Fort Worth and Denver will now be known as the FirstBank Southwest Tower.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, the institution that began as First National Bank of Ochiltree in 1907 will now, 111 years later, have its name stamped on the most prominent structure in the skyline of the largest city on the High Plains.

Samuel Capps / Wikimedia Commons

In a couple of weeks, a familiar site will disappear from downtown Amarillo. The Chase bank sign atop the city’s tallest building will vanish forever, as the national mega-bank consolidates its local operations in south Amarillo.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, the chase departure is only one of a number of high-profile evacuations of the building in recent months. Xcel Energy and West Texas A&M University have also vacated or plant to leave their spaces in the tower.

abc7amarillo.com

As Amarillo gears up to welcome minor league baseball to the yet-to-be built stadium downtown, HPPR thought it might be good to help High Plains folks brush up on their minor league knowledge.

amarillo.com

The announcement that Amarillo’s downtown area will soon receive a minor league baseball team is just the latest boon to an already healthy economy in the center of the city.

As The Amarillo Globe-News reports, Amarillo’s downtown area already has 16 commercial development projects in the works. The projects are worth a combined $150 million dollars to the local economy.

Amarillo: Liberty Theatre could get a second chance

Feb 9, 2015
Liberty Theater (Amarillo Downtown, Inc.) / myhighplains.com

The Liberty Theater could be getting a chance at a second life reports Channel Four News in Amarillo. 

The historic theater was built in 1921.  It was the only place African-Americans were welcome.

It’s been vacant for years, but a group of people are working to redevelop the building into a place for artists to perform.

commons.wikimedia.org

Another piece of the Downtown Amarillo development project has fallen into place.  Documents finalizing the property exchange between  Coca-Cola and Amarillo Economic Development Corp. are signed, sealed and delivered according to a recent article in the Amarillo Globe-News.