history

“Equal suffrage, we beg for thee/ May we hide our wrongs in thee./May the ballot men have stole/ From their soiled hands be removed;/ If polluted, here’s the cure;/ Equal suffrage’ll make it pure./ ‘Vote for women’ is our cry;/ We will scream it till we die./ When we pass this earthly pale,/We may go to heaven or- well,/ Matters not our lot may be-/ Equal suffrage makes us free.”  

The Possibility of Becoming Educated

Oct 3, 2019
Holocaust Museum, Washington DC / Wikimedia Commons

“On the highway below, the school bus rolls past without stopping. I am only seven, but I understand that it is this fact more than any other that makes my family different. We don't go to school.”

So says Tara Westover in her memoir, Educated.

amazon.com

A new book about a troubling episode in Oklahoma’s history is drawing a good deal of attention from critics. Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI is an incisive investigation into the mass murder of Osage Indians in Oklahoma—natives who were put to death so that their oil could be confiscated by white speculators.

Exhibit Highlights Oklahoma's Endangered Places

Sep 22, 2016
KFOR

A temporary exhibit at Oklahoma City’s City Hall this week is drawing attention to many of the state’s “Most Endangered Historic Places” in hopes of protecting these priceless sites, reports KFOR.

An 1880 Stagecoach Makes Its Final Journey

May 19, 2016
Provided photographs / amarillo.com

Last week in Clarendon, Texas, a crew of cowboys passed through town on a historic journey. The men were delivering pen pal mail to school children from Missouri to Texas. Their task was performed in the same way it would have been done over a hundred years ago. But the unique part, notes Amarillo.com, is the method by which they transported the letters. The cowboys made the journey in an authentic 1880 Butterfield Stagecoach. This was the coach’s swan song.

Barclay Gibson

While many towns in the Texas Panhandle have grown over the last century, others have dwindled in population, and some have been almost completely forgotten. The website texasescapes.com has a section dedicated to the ghost towns of the panhandle, where you can learn about the forgotten past of the Llano Estacado.