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HPPR People & Communities

North Texas LGBTQ Advocates React To Supreme Court Ruling On Workplace Discrimination

A rainbow flag flies in front of the Supreme Court building in Washington D.C. after SCOTUS hears arguments on LGBTQ employment rights, October 8, 2019.
A rainbow flag flies in front of the Supreme Court building in Washington D.C. after SCOTUS hears arguments on LGBTQ employment rights, October 8, 2019.

North Texas LGBTQ advocates are celebrating Monday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling on sexual discrimination in the workforce. In a 6-3 vote, the court ruled that LGBTQ employees can't be fired because of their sexual orientation. 

KERA's Alejandra Martinez talked to local LGBTQ advocates about the U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

This means the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bars sex discrimination in the workplace, now includes LGBTQ employees under its protections. The ruling has resonated across the country and advocates in North Texas spent Monday reflecting on how the victory for the LGBTQ community. 

Reverend Neil Thomas, senior pastor at the Dallas Cathedral of Hope, says the ruling is a win for all marginalized communities.
Credit Courtesy of Dallas Cathedral of Hope
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Reverend Neil Thomas, senior pastor at the Dallas Cathedral of Hope, says the ruling is a win for all marginalized communities.

“As a man of faith, this is an important step because when we work together and we find ways to bring down those systems of oppression there is definitely hope. I think it does send a signal that we are going to eventually win in the layers of discrimination that happen specifically for black and brown people —that we’re also working together to break those systems of oppression.”

Josh Cogan is the Executive Director of OutLast Youth, an organization that helps reduce LGBTQ youth homelessness.
Credit Courtesy of Josh Cogan
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Josh Cogan is the Executive Director of OutLast Youth, an organization that helps reduce LGBTQ youth homelessness.

“This is a major accomplishment. Now youth and young adults applying for jobs no longer have to have this fear that they can be wrongfully terminated for identifying as LGBTQ.”

Cece Cox is the CEO of Resource Center, an LGBTQ organization in Dallas. She says there is still work to do towards equality for all but is staying positive.
Credit Courtesy of Cece Cox.
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Cece Cox is the CEO of Resource Center, an LGBTQ organization in Dallas. She says there is still work to do towards equality for all but is staying positive.

“It’s exhilarating. This is a huge step forward where legal protections are now affirmed in place, crystal clear as it should be. And now the work continues.”

Copyright 2020 KERA