HPPR Arts, Culture & History

History:
prehistory
Native American history
early exploration
trails and railroads
homesteading
community settlement
farming & farm life
Dust Bowl era
ghost towns
personal remembrances & biographies

Culture:
ethnic groups
religion
language
cuisine
traditions
values
folklore
myths
humor

Arts:
literature
folk art
visual arts
music
theatre
events & festivals

An advisory committee is expected to recommend today that the Texas State Board of Education remove the word "heroic" from social studies curriculum when referring to defenders of the Alamo.

Outsiders

Sep 10, 2018
Posted November 24, 2016

Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese presents many lessons, and one of them is how it feels to be an outsider. All of us have this experience sometime, and for some of Wagamese’s characters, it was their permanent state.

The father-figure Bunky lives isolated in the rough backcountry of British Columbia. He is a classic loner as he raises the hero Franklin.

High Plains, we are THRILLED to welcome brilliant folk singer-songwriter Sarah McQuaid to HPPR's Living Room Concert Series as she's touring across the globe with her fifth album, If We Dig Any Deeper It Could Get Dangerous.

Sarah McQuaid - Live in Amarillo!

Friday, September 28th 
Chalice Abbey (2717 Stanley)
Doors @ 7p ~ Show @ 7:30p
Suggested Donation: $15 
***Make life easy & please bring cash!***

Redemption Never Expected

Sep 7, 2018
Leslie VonHolten

This is bold, but I’m gonna say it: Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese should be in the literary pantheon of great father and son epics.

Eldon and Frank Starlight—damaged father, strange son—travel deep into the wilderness, confronting bears and existential demons, and they even meet an oracle, the mountain woman Becka, who tells them what lies ahead. Sure, there are no loud, heroic moments. Instead, we see the grace and honor of Frank as the hero in this elegiac, quiet book.  

We Are Our Stories

Sep 5, 2018
Phillip Periman / Used with permission

“Medicine Walk,” a novel by the indigenous Canadian writer Richard Wagamese, tells the story of Frank Starlight, a 16-year-old Indian boy without a mother and who has an absent, alcoholic, Native American father, Eldon Starlight. 

Frank was raised from birth by a farmer, an older man who lives in isolation near the wilderness in British Columbia. Even though he is not an Indian, the farmer raises the boy in the Indian way, teaching him to hunt and fish, to live off the land, and to practice the Indian way, what we might call mindfulness.

Wikimedia Commons

If you grew up in Texas, it’s likely that you were treated to tales of the noble and daring fighting force known as the Texas Rangers. The myth of the Rangers as heroes has carried down through the 20th Century, from the 1950s Lone Ranger TV series to the exploits of Walker, Texas Ranger. But now, a new book seeks to paint the Rangers in a new light.

HPPR Living Room Concerts presents TWO INCREDIBLE ARTISTS in the month of September in Garden City, KS. So mark your calendars, tell your friends, and reserve your seat TODAY! 

Both shows will be at:

HPPR Studios—Garden City

210 N. 7th Street, Garden City, KS
Show @ 7:00 pm
Suggested Donation: $15 
***Make life easy & please bring cash!***

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First up!

Sweet Remains Of Last Days

Sep 3, 2018
The Metropolitan Museum

The novel Medicine Walk by Richard Wagamese is about a boy, Franklin Starlight, whose ne’er do well father shows up in his life not to help him as a mentor, but to demand help with his death process.

Eldon Starlight has not earned the right to request anything of this abandoned teenager, yet he does. End of life issues also may bring many of us face to face with relatives who make unearned demands. The grueling passage of death may cause difficult moments in even the best relationships.

A symphony with an identity crisis? Mahler's Symphony No. 1 was described in the composer's letters originally as a traditional symphony, but programs for its earliest performances described it as a symphonic poem. Thus began a series of revisions that eventually produced the definitive four movement work we'll be hearing as Jacomo Bairos conducts the Amarillo Symphony in a performance recorded April 2018 at the Globe News Center For the Performing Arts. Amarillo Symphony Presents airs Sunday at noon CT and again on Thursday 7pm CT. Hosted and produced by Stephen Johnson.

Today on High Plains Morning, we had a VERY full house. Tomorrow (September 1st) in Amarillo, the Yellow City Sounds Music Festival will rock Memorial Park on the main campus of Amarillo College from 2:00 to 10:00 p.m., so we welcomed some of the primary players into the HPPR Studio to tell us all about it.

Death as Birth - Nothing to Fear

Aug 31, 2018
Diane Goble

My name is Diane Goble from Sisters, OR:

I read Dr Gawande’s book, Being Mortal, when it first came out in 2014. I really appreciated reading end-of-life stories from a medical point of view. I was a hospice volunteer off and on for over 25 years and had a very different perspective on how healthcare decisions are made within families when no doctors, nurses or social workers are around. The one thing he and I, and Tolstoy, agree upon is that fear of death and dying seems to be nearly universal.

A big thank you to BJ Barham from American Aquarium for stopping by HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a chat about the new album, their current tour, and all the changes that have led to both. 

The Hard Questions

Aug 29, 2018
Wikimedia Commons / New York Public Library

Hi, Radio Readers – I’m Melany Wilks talking to you from my home in Colby, KS.

I had been told by a friend to read the book, Being Mortal, by Atul Gawande. So, on a long drive 16 - hour drive with my husband, we popped the CD’s into the stereo and began listening. The book held our attention, and then we purchased the book.

We’re thrilled that folk duo Ben & Emily Roberts, also known as Carolina Story, stopped in the HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a quick hello and a few songs. Their new album, Lay Your Head Down, features 12 original songs they’ve been stewing on for a long, long time. We’re so grateful the universe continued showering them with cosmic signs to keep at it, because this record has it all. They’re playing TONIGHT at the Six Car Pub and Brewery, 6pm.

High Plains Morning wants to thank Jacob Johnson, classical guitarist and lutenist based in the Dallas area, for stopping by the HPPR Studios in Amarillo for a quick chat and performance.

Jonathan Baker

On Sunday night, a group of music lovers gathered in the backyard of a house on Teckla Street in Amarillo, to hear the songs of a Panhandle musician who has gained a national reputation in recent years.

Ryan Culwell’s new record, The Last American, dropped this week, and The Washington Post promptly declared that the album “captures an American moment’s essence.”

It's A Meaningful Discussion

Aug 27, 2018
Rembrandt (1632) / Wikimedia Commons

In the last part of his book Being Mortal, Atul Gawande addresses the events following his father’s being diagnosed with a rare caner, astrocytoma of the spinal cord. Questions of surgery now or later, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, assisted living or hospice created emotions that swirled through the family like a tornado.

Facing the Ultimate Fact of Life

Aug 24, 2018
Joe Lovell - Amarillo, Texas

“Aging.”  That used to be just a word, one not often considered, that I reflexively associated with gaining access to things and experiences previously unavailable to me. 

Now, as I begin my sixth decade, “aging” is a word that reveals itself to me daily – in the aches and stiffness that greet my every morning; in the faces of my siblings, colleagues, and, of course, that sagging, grizzled image in the mirror; in the daily physical challenges of my parents and my wife’s; in the constantly declining memory of my mother-in-law.

High Plains Morning wants to thank Mr. Felipe Esparza, stand-up comedian and actor, for stopping by the station with his buddy and podcast co-host, comedian Rodrigo Torres. We had a blast chatting with you both, and here's hoping you had a great show in Amarillo!

Putting Death to Rest

Aug 22, 2018

Hello from Quinter, Kansas.  This is Valerie Brown-Kuchera, helping to pass on (no pun intended) some of the ideas generated by Being Mortal, the first book in our Fall Read theme: “Let’s Talk – Aging, Death, and Dying.”

The author, Boston surgeon Atul Gawande, discusses our culture’s approach to death and makes the case that we may have “medicalized” mortality to a psychologically unhealthy level. 

High Plains Morning wants to thank all four of the gentlemen of Che Apalache for stopping into the studio for a live set today. This four-man string band is on tour now throughout the US, and they're playing in Amarillo TONIGHT at Teckla House (2501 Teckla Blvd) in Amarillo, TX). For a full event listing, click here.

Aging - The Challenges And The Costs

Aug 20, 2018
Phillip Periman / Amarillo, Texas

I’m Dr Phillip Periman from Amarillo TX. 

In Atul Gawande’s book, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End, I found the second chapter the most sobering. In “Things Fall Apart,” previously published as an essay in The New Yorker, Gawande discusses the inevitability of the biological decline of old age.

In fact, this chapter influenced my own decision to retire from the active practice of medicine at age 78. I know of no one who can do at 88 what they did at 78.

Thanks so much to Dave Smith for taking the time to talk to HPPR listeners during High Plains Morning this  

We believe HPPR listeners will love this show as much as we did when we selected it as a new program. We're all going to miss Folk Sampler, but please check out this new show by tuning in after What the Folk? on Saturday nights at 9pm CT. 

 

What's the Problem?

Aug 17, 2018
The Green House Project

Our Radio Readers Book Club is talking about aging, death, and dying and I have something I want to get off my chest.  I’m a person of many projects and over the past few years, I’ve spent time helping some of the finest people I’ve ever known raise money to build a new kind of nursing home – neighborhoods or Green Houses like the ones Atul Gawande describes in Being Mortal.

CSAW

Next week, the Center for the Study of the American West will screen two classic Westerns in Amarillo, with a brief introduction to both films by Western scholar Alex Hunt.

The films are the legendary John Wayne-John Ford collaboration, The Searchers, on Wednesday, and John Huston's 1960, The Unforgiven, on Thursday. Both movies are set in West Texas.

We Do Have Choices

Aug 15, 2018
Wikimedia

Hello, Radio Readers! I’m Jane Holwerda from Dodge City, here to talk about aging, death and dying for our Fall 2018 book series.  

If you haven’t yet been given scary news about your health, it’s probably just a matter of time.  Dr. Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End could be a step in preparing for conversations about treatments and procedures.

Giulia Millanta is a singer/songwriter and guitarist based in Austin, TX, who sings in four languages. Her unique style is an Americana Rock cocktail with a European twist. She is feisty, humorous, raw, yet introspective and evocative—and HPPR Living Room Concerts is pleased to announce she'll be playing for fans on the High Plains!

Giulia Millanta— LIVE IN AMARILLO

Saturday, September 8th

Maintaining the Integrity of One's Life

Aug 13, 2018

In his book Being Mortal, Dr. Atul Gawande discusses nursing homes and why 50% of us will spend a year or more of our lives in one. The other 50%, especially if we are in the very old category, will live alone. Unfortunately, Gawande observes,  “We give virtually no thought to how we will live out our later years alone.”

HPPR has a big announcement: we have a new show! After much deliberation and review, we are thrilled to introduce Ozark Highlands Radio, which will replace Folk Sampler at 9pm CT on Saturday night. 

This new program has a long history. It's a weekly radio program that features live music, jam sessions and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.

Preparation Required

Aug 10, 2018
leocontent.acu.edu.au

My name is Valerie Mendoza and I’m Director of Programs for Humanities Kansas based in Topeka. 

My grandmother was an advocate for the elderly. She and others in our community noticed that those who were Spanish-speaking lacked services as they aged and in the early 1970s she helped to found a senior center for them where they could gather, socialize, and have something to look forward to.

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