Quentin Hope

Strategic Projects Director

Community: Denver, CO
Profession:  strategy, management and organization consultant

Ways to Connect

Planned Giving to HPPR

Dec 16, 2020

After over 40 years of service to the High Plains, there are now two generations of "backseat listeners" who grew up listening to HPPR from their childhood car seats and now continue to have public radio as part of their life. Making a planned gift to HPPR will ensure that public radio continues to be part of the quality of life in your community and across the High Plains for generations to come.

Quentin Hope

HPPR works to go the extra mile for you, all year long.  By operating a network of 18 stations HPPR is able to serve you in your community and in your travels across the High Plains region. 

There’s one thing you’ve heard less of on HPPR in recent months – days of on-air fundraising.  Since February we’ve reduced those days by about two-thirds of the usual, so that we could keep the programming coming to you uninterrupted and stay focused on maintaining operations during a difficult time.

Celebrate Christmas with the sound of soaring voices. Stile Antico, the award-winning choir from London, pays a visit to St. Paul's Church on Harvard Square for a concert of radiant sacred music for the Christmas season by the most acclaimed composers of the renaissance. Hear the group's luminous blend of voices sing the intricately woven music of Thomas Tallis and William Byrd. Hosted by Cathy Fuller of WGBH.

Annette Elizabeth Allen/NPR

HPPR continues its coverage of the U.S. House of Representative's impeachment proceedings with live audio and video of the House vote on impeachment today in the player below. You can also hear updates, background and analysis of the proceedings throughout the day by tuning into newscasts and regular news programs on HPPR and HPPR Connect.

TODAY ONLY: There are two great ways you can support HPPR through Giving Tuesday. HPPR is part of both the Amarillo Area Foundation's The Panhandle Gives program running from November 25 to December 3 and the Western Kansas Community Foundation’s Match Day on December 3.  You can donate through either of the programs no matter where you live, they are not geographically bound.

To participate in the Amarillo Area Fundation's The Panhandle Gives campaign

Following 37 years of tradition, High Plains Public Radio again offers listeners across the High Plains an entire schedule of wonderful Christmas programing of music, word and memories from across centuries of Christmas traditions.  Click here to see the full rundown of the programs, including links to further information, playlists, printed programs and options to listen anytime on-line.  To download a printable calendar of all the programs, click here.  We at HPPR wish you a Merry Christmas and hope these program offerings add to your enjoyment, reflections and memories.

Here are four ready ways you can make a vital contribution to High Plains Public Radio by year’s end.  You’ll reap the tax benefits for 2017 and HPPR will have your added support to continue providing you and the region with public radio service in 2018 and beyond.

City of Garden City, KS

In Kansas, some rural towns are booming while others are dwindling. Garden City, Kan., for instance, attracts people from across the globe. The population is young, growing, and extremely diverse.  And the large immigrant community provides the workforce that fuels the local economy.  None of this happened by accident, as the story notes.  Frank Morris reports.

Click on the player above or tune to your local HPPR station for complete election coverage from NPR and HPPR through the night.  While NPR covers results of the presidential race and control of congress, HPPR is covering state legislative races and ballot initiatives across the High Plains region of Kansas, Texas, Colorado and Oklahoma.  Also keep hppr.org on your screen to follow NPR’s live blog, read and hear additional election stories, and follow HPPR’s latest vote tallies on regional races:

Meg Kelly/NPR

HPPR's live broadcast of the final presidential debate begins shortly at 8pm CT.  Tune into your local HPPR station or listen here by clicking the player button above.  You can also follow the live transcript with annotations and fact-checking by clicking the box below.

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Meg Kelly/NPR

The final presidential debate is over but you can review the full transcript with annotations and fact checking from NPR by clicking on the box below.

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Click the box below to see a complete transcript of the second presidential debate Sunday night. NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, has highlighted portions of the debate text followed by context and fact checks from NPR reporters and editors.

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Meg Kelly/NPR

HPPR will provide live broadcast coverage of the final presidential debate across the High Plains region, along with live transcript and fact-checking here at hppr.org, starting Wednesday at 8 pm Central Time.  The debate will run 90 minutes without a break and will be carried by HPPR without interruption.

Test book club post

Aug 4, 2015

Setup text about the book/topic, including images, audio, links, related content, etc. along with invitation to discuss. 

Quentin Hope

Regional crude oil and natural gas prices are broadcast every weekday on HPPR during Morning Edition at 5:50, 6:32, 7:32 and 8:32 central time.  The report is compiled and voiced by Wayne Hughes of Amarillo, TX.

Complete current market information from the sources used in the regional summary report can be found at these sites:

Panhandle All Fields crude oil from Phillips 66.

Plains, Kansas is plugging away at addressing an issue facing many small towns on the High Plains – the lack of a grocery store. So far, about $400,000 in funding has been secured through tax credits, grants, donations and fund-raisers. That’s towards a total estimated cost of roughly 1.4 million dollars to buy land, build the new structure, and equip, stock and staff the store. The project is featured in this a recent New York Times article. While recognizing the determined efforts of community residents, it poses the question of whether the local grocery, if successfully built, will be able to overcome the “Walmart” effect. (Plains is located 25 miles northeast of Liberal, where there’s a Walmart, Dillons grocery and Asian, Mexican and natural food markets.)

There’s one High Plains commodity that’s likely to have another good year in 2015 – beef tongue sales to Japan. Exports were up 150 percent in 2013 and on track to rise even higher in 2014. And demand continues to grow, as do the ways of eating beef tongue in Japan, as this feature article from McClatchy DC explains:

This past Thanksgiving, James Fallow, national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine, and his wife Deborah stopped in Guymon, Oklahoma as a “a most anticipated waypoint” on their cross-country trip by small plane. The object of their sojourn that day was the homestead of Caroline Henderson whose “Letters from the Dust Bowl were published in The Atlantic some 80 years ago. Deborah Fallows recounts their flight in, visit to the homestead and Thanksgiving dinner in Guymon in this piece:

A ballot initiative being promoted by a Lakewood, Colorado couple to keep the state permanently on Mountain Daylight Time could make time keeping tricky for those crossing through four Kansas counties on the Colorado border. 

Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority (AMAFCA)

With winter on the High Plains comes the season of the tumbleweed.  The Russian thistles that dried and snapped from their roots in the fall now rove the western plains with the winter winds, leaving their seed for next year’s crop.  As a given part of winter, they’ve made their way into the seasonal holidays as well.

The biggest fight to pass open-carry legislation in Texas could be among advocates of the Second Amendment. The New York Times and Texas Tribune report that conflicts are emerging over how big the changes to the current state law should be. Gun rights supporters say the divide could sink efforts to lift handgun restrictions in the next legislative session.

United States Senator Ted Cruz opposes taxes for both internet access and internet purchases. It's not a position that's popular with schools. libraries or Main Street merchants, as reported in this article from the The Texas Tribune.

James Falows

Eighty years ago, Caroline Henderson wrote from her homestead in the Oklahoma panhandle for The Atlantic magazine.  Her popular regular installments, "Letters from the Dust Bowl", brought the reality of the daily grit and grind of the Dust Bowl to a national audience. 

A new style of luxury gun club is popping up around urban areas. They’re known as “guntry clubs” for their resemblance to country clubs, and are a far cry from dingy strip mall facilities or the rural shooting ranges with outhouse facilities known on the High Plains. The New York Times has this profile of these new clubs, featuring the Centennial Gun Club in the Denver area:

L. Brian Stauffer / www.news.illinois.edu

The FAA’s proposed rules for flying drones pose a basic problem for rural users.  The rules are based on two purposes of use, hobby versus commercial, rather than where the drone is being flown, a wide open rural area versus near an urban airport.  Consequently, many potential rural uses such as checking crops or inspecting powers lines will fall under the proposed commercial rules applied to all areas of the U.S.

National Park Service

The 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre passed recently and the use of the term “massacre” has carried great significance and stirred continued debate across the years.  It also played into the planning and naming of the current memorial on Colorado’s eastern plains as "The Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site."  That story is told in historian Ari Kelman’s 2013 book “A Misplaced Massacre: Struggling Over the Memory of Sand Creek” pub

Alfred A. Knopf

Kent Haruf, who brought to life the stories of people and town life in eastern Colorado, died at age 71 on Sunday.  His fictional town of Holt, Colorado is based on three actual towns where he grew up and is captured in his trilogy of novels “Plainsong” (1999), “Eventide” (2004), and “Benediction” (2013). 

Nick Hayes / Jonathan Cape

Many books have been written about Woody Guthrie and photographs of the Dust Bowl are recognized around the world. Now there is a graphic novel, Woody Guthrie and the Dust Bowl Ballads, that tells the story of Guthrie with imagined dialogue and stark, sepia colored illustrations.  

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